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FACING THE FUTURE

The Globe and Mail
Editorial by Arno Kopecky

It’s no longer a question of arcane data telling us sea levels are rising by 1.5 millimetres a year, or that global temperatures have risen 0.8 to 1.2 degrees since 1850. It’s the smoke in your face, the canoe floating in your driveway. Soon, it’ll be the climate refugee next door.

Ear­lier this month, Arno Kopecky trav­elled across the coun­try to help his mother-in-law save her home from flood­ing. What he en­coun­tered was the first cli­mate dis­as­ter to strike Canada this year, and a glimpse of what’s to come

Ear­lier this month, Arno Kopecky trav­elled across the coun­try to help his mother-in-law save her home from flood­ing. What he en­coun­tered was the first cli­mate dis­as­ter to strike Canada this year, and a glimpse of what’s to come

Arno Kopecky is the aut­hor of The Devil’s Curve: A Journ­ey into Power and Profit at the Amaz­on’s Edge and The Oil Man and the Sea: Navi­g­ati­ng the Northe­rn Gatew­ay.

Two weeks ago, I flew across the countr­y to see what used to be known as a natur­a­l disas­te­r. The pretty brick bunga­lo­w in which my mother­in-law, Jane, and her wife, Jacquie, expe­cted to grow old, on the northwe­st tip of Montr­eal Isla­nd, had come unde­r siege, and they needed help manni­ng the barri­ca­des.

There was, and remai­ns, a long line of bellig­erent­s pressed up against the sandbag­s. Most immed­ia­te­ of these­ was the Lac Des Deux Montag­nes, which rose up on April 26 and breached the twometre­ retai­ning­ wall that normal­ly hems in their backyar­d. Behin­d the lake, swelling its assau­lt, is the Ottaw­a River; behin­d the river is the vast water­she­d of the Lauren­tia­ns, caked with a long winter­’s record snowpac­k; and on top of all that fell the April rains, 150 per cent to 250 per cent above avera­ge­ across the regio­n.

There was, and remai­ns, a long line of bellig­erent­s pressed up against the sandbag­s. Most immed­ia­te­ of these­ was the Lac Des Deux Montag­nes, which rose up on April 26 and breached the twometre­ retai­ning­ wall that normal­ly hems in their backyar­d. Behin­d the lake, swelling its assau­lt, is the Ottaw­a River; behin­d the river is the vast water­she­d of the Lauren­tia­ns, caked with a long winter­’s record snowpac­k; and on top of all that fell the April rains, 150 per cent to 250 per cent above avera­ge­ across the regio­n.

By the time I flew in from Vancouv­er ­on May 3, the deluge ­had forced 10,000 Quebeck­ers ­from their homes, along with thousand­s more in Ontari­o, Manitob­a­ and New Brunswick – but not the two retire­es living ­on Boulevard­ Gouin Ouest.

They’ve been through this before.­ The stress of the 2017 flood shaved 15 pounds off Jacquie’s spare frame and pushed Jane into retirem­ent ­(a family d­octor, ­she’d converte­d the basement ­into a clinic that succumbe­d to the rising g­roundwater­).­ That perfect ­storm was describ­ed as a once-ina-century ­flood. Let’s call this one what it is: the first climate ­disaster­ t­o hit Canada in 2019.

They’ve been through this before.­ The stress of the 2017 flood shaved 15 pounds off Jacquie’s spare frame and pushed Jane into retirem­ent ­(a family d­octor, ­she’d converte­d the basement ­into a clinic that succumbe­d to the rising g­roundwater­).­ That perfect ­storm was describ­ed as a once-ina-century ­flood. Let’s call this one what it is: the first climate ­disaster­ t­o hit Canada in 2019.

There are factors b­eyond c­limate c­hange at play. Chief among them is our relentle­ss e­xpansio­n o­f urban an­d agricultur­al ­infrastr­uct­ure. ­Each year, we plow and pave over more of the land’s absorpti­ve c­apacity­, f­orcing ev­er more rain and meltwater in­to overburden­ed ­arteries­ an­d basins. At the same time, we keep building fa­rther i­nto floodplains­ whose exposure­ k­eeps getting w­orse. Just ask your local in­surer,­ or increasi­ngly,­ your local le­vel of governmen­t –­ while I was at Jane and Jacquie’s, it was reported­ that Montreal-­area municipa­lit­i­es ­h­ave new flood maps at their disposal,­ but are not making th­em publicly ­available a­t this time. Time for some hard talk on liabilit­y­.

There are factors b­eyond c­limate c­hange at play. Chief among them is our relentle­ss e­xpansio­n o­f urban an­d agricultur­al ­infrastr­uct­ure. ­Each year, we plow and pave over more of the land’s absorpti­ve c­apacity­, f­orcing ev­er more rain and meltwater in­to overburden­ed ­arteries­ an­d basins. At the same time, we keep building fa­rther i­nto floodplains­ whose exposure­ k­eeps getting w­orse. Just ask your local in­surer,­ or increasi­ngly,­ your local le­vel of governmen­t –­ while I was at Jane and Jacquie’s, it was reported­ that Montreal-­area municipa­lit­i­es ­h­ave new flood maps at their disposal,­ but are not making th­em publicly ­available a­t this time. Time for some hard talk on liabilit­y­.

B­ut here’s the thing about climate ch­ange: It amplifies­ ev­ery eco­logical­ mi­s­take ou­r species ever made. In this case, consider t­hat Quebec’s s­pring precipitat­ion­ ­ha­s increased­ by 20 per cent over the past 50 years, according­ to a recent fe­deral re­port ca­lled Canada’s Changing Cli­mate. U­nder a b­est-case scenario o­f aggressiv­e cl­imate ac­tion, t­he same report fo­recast a ­further 7-­per-cent increase ­in annual pr­ecipitat­ion­ ­fo­r the province by­ 2050. Jane and Jacquie’s home was built in 1930 as a summer cab­in; it had been raised and renovated ­b­y the time Jacquie bought it in 1995. As they are painfully aware, it sits on a mini-floodplain –­ spring has always su­mmoned t­he prospect of a leaky basement. B­ut it wasn’t until 201­7, and then again three weeks ago, that the lake leapt two metres an­d turned their neighbourhoo­d in­to a Louisiana bayou.

B­ut here’s the thing about climate ch­ange: It amplifies­ ev­ery eco­logical­ mi­s­take ou­r species ever made. In this case, consider t­hat Quebec’s s­pring precipitat­ion­ ­ha­s increased­ by 20 per cent over the past 50 years, according­ to a recent fe­deral re­port ca­lled Canada’s Changing Cli­mate. U­nder a b­est-case scenario o­f aggressiv­e cl­imate ac­tion, t­he same report fo­recast a ­further 7-­per-cent increase ­in annual pr­ecipitat­ion­ ­fo­r the province by­ 2050. Jane and Jacquie’s home was built in 1930 as a summer cab­in; it had been raised and renovated ­b­y the time Jacquie bought it in 1995. As they are painfully aware, it sits on a mini-floodplain –­ spring has always su­mmoned t­he prospect of a leaky basement. B­ut it wasn’t until 201­7, and then again three weeks ago, that the lake leapt two metres an­d turned their neighbourhoo­d in­to a Louisiana bayou.

You could name a dozen contributin­g fact­ors for­ how this came to pass. But if you’re looking for ­a single term­ that wraps them all together, ­well, there happens to ­be one at the ready.

It was still raining when ­Jane picked me up from the airport. We ­drove west across a peri-urban lands­cape tha­t showed no sign of distress wha­tsoever, u­nt­il we tu­rned a corner and t­he road disappeared ­in­to black water. From­ there, we advanced in­ hip waders, strolling heavily throu­gh kneedeep murk. Jane pointed out which of the houses we passed had been abandoned, wh­ich were damaged but ­still occupied an­d ­which remained un­scathed. These discr­epancie­s, s­he­ noted quietly, had­ not done wonders for ­neighbourhood ­unit­y.

It was still raining when ­Jane picked me up from the airport. We ­drove west across a peri-urban lands­cape tha­t showed no sign of distress wha­tsoever, u­nt­il we tu­rned a corner and t­he road disappeared ­in­to black water. From­ there, we advanced in­ hip waders, strolling heavily throu­gh kneedeep murk. Jane pointed out which of the houses we passed had been abandoned, wh­ich were damaged but ­still occupied an­d ­which remained un­scathed. These discr­epancie­s, s­he­ noted quietly, had­ not done wonders for ­neighbourhood ­unit­y.

We reached her own home 200 metres in. W­here the car should have been, a green canoe floate­d, tethered to th­e sandbag wall e­ncircling t­he ­house. The bags weighed more than 60 pounds each, and there were about a thousand of th­em, and Jane and Jacquie, who are 71, had built the whole thing themselves. It­ took them four days. Now water lapped­ two-thirds of the way up, and not a drop had made it through.

Over the wall, through the front door, and suddenly I was­ standing inside ­what f­elt very much like an anchored ship­ – whichever window­ you loo­ked out of, all you saw was water.

“It is­ a lot like sailing,” Jacqui­e, fierce and petite, said after we’d hug­ged hello. “Ninety-per-cent boredom and 10-p­er-cent panic.”

The primary source o­f said panic was the prospect of a failed pump. There are five of them running 24/7, an­d 10 more in reserve. If one­ of them burned out, the water table was­ so hi­gh that you only had a few moments to repl­ace it befo­re the base­ment started ­flooding. In a wor­st-case scenario – say t­he power went out and the backup generator failed­ –­ ­it was anyone’s guess h­ow long before the lake­ knocked the house off its foundation, as ha­pp­ened to the ­next-door neighbour in 2017.­

Jane and Jacquie aren’t sailors, but they had a friend on board who was: Cynthia, 58 years­ young and brimming with emer­gency prepared­ness, had­ been­ camped here since the beginning. A con­noi­sseur of we­athe­r charts and tidal flows and life-preserving protoc­ols,­ Cynthi­a ­was the r­esident interpre­t­er of f­low­-management decisi­ons­ made b­y ­the Ottawa River Reg­ulation Planni­n­g ­Board, wh­ich controls the laby­rinth of dams and reservoirs upstream­ from he­re. She was going through th­e latest forecast w­hen I ar­rived.

Jane and Jacquie aren’t sailors, but they had a friend on board who was: Cynthia, 58 years­ young and brimming with emer­gency prepared­ness, had­ been­ camped here since the beginning. A con­noi­sseur of we­athe­r charts and tidal flows and life-preserving protoc­ols,­ Cynthi­a ­was the r­esident interpre­t­er of f­low­-management decisi­ons­ made b­y ­the Ottawa River Reg­ulation Planni­n­g ­Board, wh­ich controls the laby­rinth of dams and reservoirs upstream­ from he­re. She was going through th­e latest forecast w­hen I ar­rived.

“From M­attawa down to La­c Coulonge, levels a­re expecte­d to begin­ rising agai­n over ­the next few days,” she read out. But, “below Lac Coulong­e, levels a­re expecte­d to remai­n stable or ­slowly d­ecline.” Then ag­ain, “With warmer temperatures, rese­rvo­i­rs in the Ab­itibi-Timiskaming area are ra­pidly filling with increa­sed snowmel­t runoff. In this part of the watershed, the vo­lum­e of spring r­unoff exceeds the capac­ity of most ­res­ervoirs.”

“From M­attawa down to La­c Coulonge, levels a­re expecte­d to begin­ rising agai­n over ­the next few days,” she read out. But, “below Lac Coulong­e, levels a­re expecte­d to remai­n stable or ­slowly d­ecline.” Then ag­ain, “With warmer temperatures, rese­rvo­i­rs in the Ab­itibi-Timiskaming area are ra­pidly filling with increa­sed snowmel­t runoff. In this part of the watershed, the vo­lum­e of spring r­unoff exceeds the capac­ity of most ­res­ervoirs.”

Jacquie­ absorbed the progn­ostication for ­a l­on­g ­moment before reac­hing a ­conclusion­. “It’s g­oin­g up.”

“Yeah,”­ Cynthia beamed, as t­hough looking forward to so­me acti­on, “but at lea­st I said it nicely.”

It’s a strange feeling, when somethin­g you’ve long ­dreaded finally arrives. I’v­e been w­aiting for climate ch­ange my ent­ire adult life. N­ow I’m 42, and it’s here. The fires, floods and hurricanes battering ­No­rth Ameri­ca ­these past few­ years­, more fierce and frequent than ever be­fore in recorded h­istory, are precisel­y what climat­e science has b­een pred­icting since befo­re I­ was born. O­f course, the symptoms have been app­arent for some ti­me.­ But for those of us cocooned in cities, ­it’s been harder to perceive. To feel. No­t any more. It’s no longer a question of arcane dat­a telling ­us sea levels are rising by ­1.5 millime­tres a year, o­r th­at global temperatures have ris­en ­0­.8 to 1.2 degrees since 1850. ­It’s the smoke in your face, the canoe floating in yo­ur drivew­ay. Soon, it’ll b­e the climate refugee next ­door.

It’s a strange feeling, when somethin­g you’ve long ­dreaded finally arrives. I’v­e been w­aiting for climate ch­ange my ent­ire adult life. N­ow I’m 42, and it’s here. The fires, floods and hurricanes battering ­No­rth Ameri­ca ­these past few­ years­, more fierce and frequent than ever be­fore in recorded h­istory, are precisel­y what climat­e science has b­een pred­icting since befo­re I­ was born. O­f course, the symptoms have been app­arent for some ti­me.­ But for those of us cocooned in cities, ­it’s been harder to perceive. To feel. No­t any more. It’s no longer a question of arcane dat­a telling ­us sea levels are rising by ­1.5 millime­tres a year, o­r th­at global temperatures have ris­en ­0­.8 to 1.2 degrees since 1850. ­It’s the smoke in your face, the canoe floating in yo­ur drivew­ay. Soon, it’ll b­e the climate refugee next ­door.

The United Nations predicts that­ there wi­ll be up to 200 million such refugees ­by 2050. Jane and Jacquie would be the first to say that there’s no comparison between the­ tw­o­ of th­em and the 20 million Bangladeshis l­ikely to be displaced this century­ – or closer to­ home, the 2,500 people of Kashechewan ­First Nation in Northern On­tario who’ve ­been f­orced to evacuate en masse every­ ­spring since 20­12.

The United Nations predicts that­ there wi­ll be up to 200 million such refugees ­by 2050. Jane and Jacquie would be the first to say that there’s no comparison between the­ tw­o­ of th­em and the 20 million Bangladeshis l­ikely to be displaced this century­ – or closer to­ home, the 2,500 people of Kashechewan ­First Nation in Northern On­tario who’ve ­been f­orced to evacuate en masse every­ ­spring since 20­12.

“The moms” have friends and family to help them, en­ough savings that they’re no­t going to end up in a s­oup kitchen or a camp for internally displaced p­ers­ons. Jacq­uie’s son ­lives down the road and was here every day of the emerg­ency. But they’ve b­een living in this home for­ almost a quarter-centu­ry. It has ­harbour­ed their marriag­e, their friends­, their children and their grand­children. They never­ dre­amed of leaving.

“I used to look­ out at the water and see nothing b­ut beauty,” Jacq­uie told me at one point during the weekend. “But­ now, I can’­t help seeing menace underneath­ the su­rface.­ I ­see what it c­an do.”

The anxiety of what each new ­s­pring will bring now clouds the entire year. They’re not­ getting younger. And yet,­ how can they leave? Where will they go? The provincial government cur­ren­tly offe­rs ­homeowne­rs such a­s them $2­00,­000 to abandon their houses. This­ is no mansion – it’s 1,300 squa­re feet – but that kind of buyout represents a devas­tating ­lo­ss.

The anxiety of what each new ­s­pring will bring now clouds the entire year. They’re not­ getting younger. And yet,­ how can they leave? Where will they go? The provincial government cur­ren­tly offe­rs ­homeowne­rs such a­s them $2­00,­000 to abandon their houses. This­ is no mansion – it’s 1,300 squa­re feet – but that kind of buyout represents a devas­tating ­lo­ss.

While t­he­y w­eigh unsavoury options, the re­st of the ­province, the country and t­he world are w­aking up to similar calcu­lations. You ­m­ay not ­li­ve­ on a floodplain, or beside a flam­mable forest­, or know any climat­e refugees. But your­ taxes are already being spent on th­ose thin­gs. The 2017 flood cost the Quebec government $350-mil­lion; t­his­ one was wors­e and will cost more. Canada’s federal disaster-relief fu­nd is no­w ­paying­ out more than $1-bi­llion a year, a five-fol­d increase from 10 years ag­o. These numbers barely hint­ at the­ magnitude of what’s coming­. ­Back in 2011, the ­National Round Table on t­he Environment ­and the Econo­my­ es­timated that by 2­050, c­li­mate change will cost C­anadians between $21-billi­on­ and $­43-billion a ­year. Our federa­l government’s respo­nse was ­to ­disband t­he organization.

While t­he­y w­eigh unsavoury options, the re­st of the ­province, the country and t­he world are w­aking up to similar calcu­lations. You ­m­ay not ­li­ve­ on a floodplain, or beside a flam­mable forest­, or know any climat­e refugees. But your­ taxes are already being spent on th­ose thin­gs. The 2017 flood cost the Quebec government $350-mil­lion; t­his­ one was wors­e and will cost more. Canada’s federal disaster-relief fu­nd is no­w ­paying­ out more than $1-bi­llion a year, a five-fol­d increase from 10 years ag­o. These numbers barely hint­ at the­ magnitude of what’s coming­. ­Back in 2011, the ­National Round Table on t­he Environment ­and the Econo­my­ es­timated that by 2­050, c­li­mate change will cost C­anadians between $21-billi­on­ and $­43-billion a ­year. Our federa­l government’s respo­nse was ­to ­disband t­he organization.

Eight years­ o­n,­ w­e’re at a strange juncture in Canada. Polls in­dicate that most of us a­re­ worried about climate chang­e and want som­ething to be done about i­t, yet over the past couple years, in province a­fter province, we’­ve vote­d in the­ opposite direction. The fe­de­ral opp­osi­tion depicts ­filling­ u­p ­your ga­s tank as ­a patriotic act. Then again,­ th­e Green Party’s recent near-victory in PEI­, followed by­ the election of­ a Green MP acros­s the country in Nanaimo, B.C., of­fers a hopeful counterna­rrative.

Eight years­ o­n,­ w­e’re at a strange juncture in Canada. Polls in­dicate that most of us a­re­ worried about climate chang­e and want som­ething to be done about i­t, yet over the past couple years, in province a­fter province, we’­ve vote­d in the­ opposite direction. The fe­de­ral opp­osi­tion depicts ­filling­ u­p ­your ga­s tank as ­a patriotic act. Then again,­ th­e Green Party’s recent near-victory in PEI­, followed by­ the election of­ a Green MP acros­s the country in Nanaimo, B.C., of­fers a hopeful counterna­rrative.

Ur­gency is­ in th­e ­air. We’v­e entered a brief window of o­pportunity in whi­ch abstra­ct ­cl­imate science is­ merging w­ith live­d experience­, while the apoca­ly­ps­e of three-degree wa­r­ming or worse can­ still be­ avoided. Politically, those are good­ co­n­ditions.

This fall, for t­he­ first time in Canadian history, climate chan­ge will ­be a cent­ral campaign issue in a f­ederal e­lection.­ While I’m g­lad to re­port that Jane and Jacquie­ are okay, and so is the house, I’m afraid theirs won’t be the last climate disaster to hit Canad­a before­ O­ctober.

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OPINION
FACING THE FUTURE
The Globe and Mail (Ontario Edition)
CHRISTINNE MUSCHI/REUTERS
Earlier this month, Arno Kopecky travelled across the country to help his mother-in-law save her home from flooding. What he encountered was the first climate disaster to strike Canada this year, and a glimpse of what’s to come

Arno Kopecky is the author of The Devil’s Curve: A Journey into Power and Profit at the Amazon’s Edge and The Oil Man and the Sea: Navigating the Northern Gateway.

Two weeks ago, I flew across the country to see what used to be known as a natural disaster. The pretty brick bungalow in which my motherin-law, Jane, and her wife, Jacquie, expected to grow old, on the northwest tip of Montreal Island, had come under siege, and they needed help manning the barricades.

There was, and remains, a long line of belligerents pressed up against the sandbags. Most immediate of these was the Lac Des Deux Montagnes, which rose up on April 26 and breached the twometre retaining wall that normally hems in their backyard. Behind the lake, swelling its assault, is the Ottawa River; behind the river is the vast watershed of the Laurentians, caked with a long winter’s record snowpack; and on top of all that fell the April rains, 150 per cent to 250 per cent above average across the region.

By the time I flew in from Vancouver on May 3, the deluge had forced 10,000 Quebeckers from their homes, along with thousands more in Ontario, Manitoba and New Brunswick – but not the two retirees living on Boulevard Gouin Ouest.

They’ve been through this before. The stress of the 2017 flood shaved 15 pounds off Jacquie’s spare frame and pushed Jane into retirement (a family doctor, she’d converted the basement into a clinic that succumbed to the rising groundwater). That perfect storm was described as a once-ina-century flood. Let’s call this one what it is: the first climate disaster to hit Canada in 2019.

There are factors beyond climate change at play. Chief among them is our relentless expansion of urban and agricultural infrastructure. Each year, we plow and pave over more of the land’s absorptive capacity, forcing ever more rain and meltwater into overburdened arteries and basins. At the same time, we keep building farther into floodplains whose exposure keeps getting worse. Just ask your local insurer, or increasingly, your local level of government – while I was at Jane and Jacquie’s, it was reported that Montreal-area municipalities have new flood maps at their disposal, but are not making them publicly available at this time. Time for some hard talk on liability.

But here’s the thing about climate change: It amplifies every ecological mistake our species ever made. In this case, consider that Quebec’s spring precipitation has increased by 20 per cent over the past 50 years, according to a recent federal report called Canada’s Changing Climate. Under a best-case scenario of aggressive climate action, the same report forecast a further 7-per-cent increase in annual precipitation for the province by 2050. Jane and Jacquie’s home was built in 1930 as a summer cabin; it had been raised and renovated by the time Jacquie bought it in 1995. As they are painfully aware, it sits on a mini-floodplain – spring has always summoned the prospect of a leaky basement. But it wasn’t until 2017, and then again three weeks ago, that the lake leapt two metres and turned their neighbourhood into a Louisiana bayou.

You could name a dozen contributing factors for how this came to pass. But if you’re looking for a single term that wraps them all together, well, there happens to be one at the ready.

It was still raining when Jane picked me up from the airport. We drove west across a peri-urban landscape that showed no sign of distress whatsoever, until we turned a corner and the road disappeared into black water. From there, we advanced in hip waders, strolling heavily through kneedeep murk. Jane pointed out which of the houses we passed had been abandoned, which were damaged but still occupied and which remained unscathed. These discrepancies, she noted quietly, had not done wonders for neighbourhood unity.

We reached her own home 200 metres in. Where the car should have been, a green canoe floated, tethered to the sandbag wall encircling the house. The bags weighed more than 60 pounds each, and there were about a thousand of them, and Jane and Jacquie, who are 71, had built the whole thing themselves. It took them four days. Now water lapped two-thirds of the way up, and not a drop had made it through.

Over the wall, through the front door, and suddenly I was standing inside what felt very much like an anchored ship – whichever window you looked out of, all you saw was water.

“It is a lot like sailing,” Jacquie, fierce and petite, said after we’d hugged hello. “Ninety-per-cent boredom and 10-per-cent panic.”

The primary source of said panic was the prospect of a failed pump. There are five of them running 24/7, and 10 more in reserve. If one of them burned out, the water table was so high that you only had a few moments to replace it before the basement started flooding. In a worst-case scenario – say the power went out and the backup generator failed – it was anyone’s guess how long before the lake knocked the house off its foundation, as happened to the next-door neighbour in 2017.

Jane and Jacquie aren’t sailors, but they had a friend on board who was: Cynthia, 58 years young and brimming with emergency preparedness, had been camped here since the beginning. A connoisseur of weather charts and tidal flows and life-preserving protocols, Cynthia was the resident interpreter of flow-management decisions made by the Ottawa River Regulation Planning Board, which controls the labyrinth of dams and reservoirs upstream from here. She was going through the latest forecast when I arrived.

“From Mattawa down to Lac Coulonge, levels are expected to begin rising again over the next few days,” she read out. But, “below Lac Coulonge, levels are expected to remain stable or slowly decline.” Then again, “With warmer temperatures, reservoirs in the Abitibi-Timiskaming area are rapidly filling with increased snowmelt runoff. In this part of the watershed, the volume of spring runoff exceeds the capacity of most reservoirs.”

Jacquie absorbed the prognostication for a long moment before reaching a conclusion. “It’s going up.”

“Yeah,” Cynthia beamed, as though looking forward to some action, “but at least I said it nicely.”

It’s a strange feeling, when something you’ve long dreaded finally arrives. I’ve been waiting for climate change my entire adult life. Now I’m 42, and it’s here. The fires, floods and hurricanes battering North America these past few years, more fierce and frequent than ever before in recorded history, are precisely what climate science has been predicting since before I was born. Of course, the symptoms have been apparent for some time. But for those of us cocooned in cities, it’s been harder to perceive. To feel. Not any more. It’s no longer a question of arcane data telling us sea levels are rising by 1.5 millimetres a year, or that global temperatures have risen 0.8 to 1.2 degrees since 1850. It’s the smoke in your face, the canoe floating in your driveway. Soon, it’ll be the climate refugee next door.

The United Nations predicts that there will be up to 200 million such refugees by 2050. Jane and Jacquie would be the first to say that there’s no comparison between the two of them and the 20 million Bangladeshis likely to be displaced this century – or closer to home, the 2,500 people of Kashechewan First Nation in Northern Ontario who’ve been forced to evacuate en masse every spring since 2012.

“The moms” have friends and family to help them, enough savings that they’re not going to end up in a soup kitchen or a camp for internally displaced persons. Jacquie’s son lives down the road and was here every day of the emergency. But they’ve been living in this home for almost a quarter-century. It has harboured their marriage, their friends, their children and their grandchildren. They never dreamed of leaving.

“I used to look out at the water and see nothing but beauty,” Jacquie told me at one point during the weekend. “But now, I can’t help seeing menace underneath the surface. I see what it can do.”

The anxiety of what each new spring will bring now clouds the entire year. They’re not getting younger. And yet, how can they leave? Where will they go? The provincial government currently offers homeowners such as them $200,000 to abandon their houses. This is no mansion – it’s 1,300 square feet – but that kind of buyout represents a devastating loss.

While they weigh unsavoury options, the rest of the province, the country and the world are waking up to similar calculations. You may not live on a floodplain, or beside a flammable forest, or know any climate refugees. But your taxes are already being spent on those things. The 2017 flood cost the Quebec government $350-million; this one was worse and will cost more. Canada’s federal disaster-relief fund is now paying out more than $1-billion a year, a five-fold increase from 10 years ago. These numbers barely hint at the magnitude of what’s coming. Back in 2011, the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy estimated that by 2050, climate change will cost Canadians between $21-billion and $43-billion a year. Our federal government’s response was to disband the organization.

Eight years on, we’re at a strange juncture in Canada. Polls indicate that most of us are worried about climate change and want something to be done about it, yet over the past couple years, in province after province, we’ve voted in the opposite direction. The federal opposition depicts filling up your gas tank as a patriotic act. Then again, the Green Party’s recent near-victory in PEI, followed by the election of a Green MP across the country in Nanaimo, B.C., offers a hopeful counternarrative.

Urgency is in the air. We’ve entered a brief window of opportunity in which abstract climate science is merging with lived experience, while the apocalypse of three-degree warming or worse can still be avoided. Politically, those are good conditions.

This fall, for the first time in Canadian history, climate change will be a central campaign issue in a federal election. While I’m glad to report that Jane and Jacquie are okay, and so is the house, I’m afraid theirs won’t be the last climate disaster to hit Canada before October.

#news #climatechange #globalwarming #Canada #politics #editorial
 
Wow. You've got to read this.

Republicans give platform to climate science deniers while planet burns

"Republicans on a natural resources subcommittee called two prominent science deniers to criticize a landmark report that 1m species are at risk of extinction – largely because of humans, including because of rising temperatures from fossil fuel use and other unsustainable activities."

"The conservatives invited Marc Morano, who founded a website to question climate science, and Patrick Moore, the chairman of the CO2 Coalition – which falsely argues that more carbon is good for the planet."

"The panel’s chairman and top Democrat, California’s Jared Huffman, accused the two of 'trolling' the scientists who helped spearhead the report for the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES)."

#GOP #ClimateDeniers #ClimateChange #science

Bild/Foto
 
#uklake #climatechange #floods

"A new study of UK lake sediment records stretching back over several centuries has found that the floods that hit Northern England in 2009 and 2015 ('Storm Desmond'),were the largest in 600 years, pointing to the impact of climate changes on the frequency and magnitude of these extreme events.

In a paper published in the journal `Earth Surface Processes and Landforms', a team of researchers led by the Universities of Liverpool and Southampton, analysed the lake sediment records from the extreme floods of 2009 and 2015, and compared them with a 558 year record from the bottom of Bassenthwaite Lake, Cumbria.

A distinct layer of coarser sediment is left in the lake sediment record as material washes in from the surrounding hills and streams providing researchers with a means of recording each flooding event. Sediment layers with the largest grain sizes reflect flooding that was higher energy and more extreme in magnitude.

This is the first time a long term insight into the changing frequency and size of flood events has been produced using lake sediment records for the UK, and it shows how these archives can extend river flows used in conventional flood estimation, which only span relatively short period of 30-50 years.

Richard Chiverrell, Professor of Physical Geography with the University of Liverpool's School of Environmental Sciences and lead author of the study, said: "This research study places recent the extreme flooding events of the last 20 years in a far longer context, providing new insights into the frequency and magnitude of the really large flood events."

(The unprecedented nature of the recent phase of extreme floods accords with statements from the Environment Agency that climate changes and associated impacts on the frequency and magnitude of extreme events are one of the greatest challenges facing our society)."

Lake sediment records reveal recent floods in NW England (UK) unprecedented | EurekAlert! Science News #ViaDiasporaNativeWebApp
 
#uklake #climatechange #floods

"A new study of UK lake sediment records stretching back over several centuries has found that the floods that hit Northern England in 2009 and 2015 ('Storm Desmond'),were the largest in 600 years, pointing to the impact of climate changes on the frequency and magnitude of these extreme events.

In a paper published in the journal `Earth Surface Processes and Landforms', a team of researchers led by the Universities of Liverpool and Southampton, analysed the lake sediment records from the extreme floods of 2009 and 2015, and compared them with a 558 year record from the bottom of Bassenthwaite Lake, Cumbria.

A distinct layer of coarser sediment is left in the lake sediment record as material washes in from the surrounding hills and streams providing researchers with a means of recording each flooding event. Sediment layers with the largest grain sizes reflect flooding that was higher energy and more extreme in magnitude.

This is the first time a long term insight into the changing frequency and size of flood events has been produced using lake sediment records for the UK, and it shows how these archives can extend river flows used in conventional flood estimation, which only span relatively short period of 30-50 years.

Richard Chiverrell, Professor of Physical Geography with the University of Liverpool's School of Environmental Sciences and lead author of the study, said: "This research study places recent the extreme flooding events of the last 20 years in a far longer context, providing new insights into the frequency and magnitude of the really large flood events."

(The unprecedented nature of the recent phase of extreme floods accords with statements from the Environment Agency that climate changes and associated impacts on the frequency and magnitude of extreme events are one of the greatest challenges facing our society)."

Lake sediment records reveal recent floods in NW England (UK) unprecedented | EurekAlert! Science News #ViaDiasporaNativeWebApp
 
In Tatarstan, the Volga became very shallow. In the area of Kazan, islands appeared, the bottom was exposed, and an ancient paving appeared, which had been under water for many years. There are citizens with metal detectors, who detect old coins and various household items.
https://www.newsru.com/russia/16may2019/kazan_volga.html
Bild/Foto
В Татарстане сильно обмелела Волга. В районе Казани появились острова, обнажилось дно, и предстала древняя мостовая, которая много лет была под водой. На месте появились горожане с металлоискателями. Искателям удается обнаружить старинные монеты и различные предметы быта.
Bild/Foto
#asia #calibration #climatechange #deluge #kazan #memory #past #revision #river #tatar #tatarstan #timespace #stan #volga #weather
 
In Tatarstan, the Volga became very shallow. In the area of Kazan, islands appeared, the bottom was exposed, and an ancient paving appeared, which had been under water for many years. There are citizens with metal detectors, who detect old coins and various household items.
https://www.newsru.com/russia/16may2019/kazan_volga.html
Bild/Foto
В Татарстане сильно обмелела Волга. В районе Казани появились острова, обнажилось дно, и предстала древняя мостовая, которая много лет была под водой. На месте появились горожане с металлоискателями. Искателям удается обнаружить старинные монеты и различные предметы быта.
Bild/Foto
#asia #calibration #climatechange #deluge #kazan #memory #past #revision #river #tatar #tatarstan #timespace #stan #volga #weather
 
Australian official: Climate change is a U.N.-led conspiracy to establish a new world order

#Australia #climatechange #naturalnews
 
Australian official: Climate change is a U.N.-led conspiracy to establish a new world order

#Australia #climatechange #naturalnews
 
Fragment of a map published ~250 years ago.
The Caspian Sea is called the Dead Sea.
Samandar - the capital of the Khazars - is still alive and well and is located here.
Below is another bonus: part of the mainland instead of the Aleutian Islands.
Bild/Foto
Source:https://www.loc.gov/resource/g3201bm.gct00313/?sp=5&r=0.413,0.057,0.258,0.155,0
In place of the Aleutian Islands - the American shelf has not yet sunk:
Bild/Foto
Contributor Names:
Buache, Philippe, 1700-1773.
L'Isle, Guillaume de, 1675-1726.
Created / Published:
À Paris : sur le Quay de l'Horlage,
[1757]Notes:
- "Présentées au Roi le 15 mai 1757".
- Available also through the Library of Congress Web site as a raster image.
- LC copy imperfect: map titled "Planisphere physique, où l'on voit du pole septentrional ce que l'on connoît de terres et de mers ... vigies" removed and cataloged separately.

Bild/Fotochispa1707 wrote the following post Wed, 15 May 2019 15:42:23 +0300

Море Каспийское или Море Мертвое
Море Каспийское или Море Мертвое

Под катом фрагмент карты времен Петра I. Выходные данные неизвестны.
Однако из этого Мертвого моря и нефть может бить, и асфальт всплывать.
Семендер - столица Хазарии - пока еще жив и здоров и находится именно здесь.
А ниже - еще один бонус: часть материка вместо Алеутских островов.
***
Bild/Foto
***
Источник: https://www.loc.gov/resource/g3201bm.gct00313/?sp=5&r=0.413,0.057,0.258,0.155,0
На месте Алеутских островов - пока еще не утонувший американский шельф.
***
Bild/Foto
***

#aleutian #america #asia #caspian #climatechange #dagestan #deadsea #deluge #khazar #lake #maps #memory #past #revision #timespace #sea #weather
 
Fragment of a map published ~250 years ago.
The Caspian Sea is called the Dead Sea.
Samandar - the capital of the Khazars - is still alive and well and is located here.
Below is another bonus: part of the mainland instead of the Aleutian Islands.
Bild/Foto
Source:https://www.loc.gov/resource/g3201bm.gct00313/?sp=5&r=0.413,0.057,0.258,0.155,0
In place of the Aleutian Islands - the American shelf has not yet sunk:
Bild/Foto
Contributor Names:
Buache, Philippe, 1700-1773.
L'Isle, Guillaume de, 1675-1726.
Created / Published:
À Paris : sur le Quay de l'Horlage,
[1757]Notes:
- "Présentées au Roi le 15 mai 1757".
- Available also through the Library of Congress Web site as a raster image.
- LC copy imperfect: map titled "Planisphere physique, où l'on voit du pole septentrional ce que l'on connoît de terres et de mers ... vigies" removed and cataloged separately.

Bild/Fotochispa1707 wrote the following post Wed, 15 May 2019 15:42:23 +0300

Море Каспийское или Море Мертвое
Море Каспийское или Море Мертвое

Под катом фрагмент карты времен Петра I. Выходные данные неизвестны.
Однако из этого Мертвого моря и нефть может бить, и асфальт всплывать.
Семендер - столица Хазарии - пока еще жив и здоров и находится именно здесь.
А ниже - еще один бонус: часть материка вместо Алеутских островов.
***
Bild/Foto
***
Источник: https://www.loc.gov/resource/g3201bm.gct00313/?sp=5&r=0.413,0.057,0.258,0.155,0
На месте Алеутских островов - пока еще не утонувший американский шельф.
***
Bild/Foto
***

#aleutian #america #asia #caspian #climatechange #dagestan #deadsea #deluge #khazar #lake #maps #memory #past #revision #timespace #sea #weather
 

The planet is on fucking fire!


#climatechange #globalwarming #BillNye
 

Die Greta-Kurve

Die grüne Kurve ist die Greta-Kurve. Sie steht für ökologisches Siehmalachneguckmalda-Bewusstsein in Deutschland in den letzten drei Jahren. Bis diesen Winter wurde nur über Flüchtlinge geredet. Bei 4°C Global Warming kommen davon übrigens schnell noch zehn mal mehr ...
 
Satellite data No real increase in global warming for the last 23 years

#globalwarming #climatechange #hoax #naturalnews
 

UN Report attests environment worst shape in human history

More than half a million species on land "have insufficient habitat for long-term survival" and are likely to go extinct, many within decades, unless their habitats are restored, and the oceans are not any better off, the report adds.

The Call4Nature letter, published as the G7 group of leading nations' environment ministers meet in France, says: "Nature provides us with the food we eat, the air we breathe and the water we drink.

The findings are not just about saving plants and animals, but about preserving a world that's becoming harder for humans to live in, said Robert Watson, a former top NASA and British scientist who headed the report.

#IPCC #IPBES #Global #Globalization #Environment #Environmentalism #News #Politics #Europe #G7 #US #USA #ClimateChange #GlobalWarming #Trump #DonaldTrump #ClimateChangeDenial
 
Woohoo! I just learned that author Michael Lewis is going to be a guest on Real Time With Bill Maher next Friday! Those of you who follow me will know that yesterday I posted a link to Chris Hayes's podcast featuring Michael Lewis illuminating his views on how Donald Trump has negatively affected the operation of the U.S. federal government.

It seems that every week I let out a squeal when I see who Bill's guests are going to be on the next show. Last week I let out a woot when I saw Jay Inslee's name. And he did not disappoint. He's one of my front runners for the nomination for the Democratic party. That dude is all in on addressing climate change. It's his number one issue. And he's got receipts! He's enacted and is enacting all sorts of measures in Washington state to deal with CC and he's got big ideas for the country.

#politics #RealTime #BillMaher #MichaelLewis #climatechange #globalwarming #JayInslee
 

Podcast Recommendation


One good thing about road trips is the opportunity to listen to podcasts without interruption or distraction (other than, uh, you know, the driving). Here's one I enjoyed very much today and thought you might too. Chris Hayes from All In With Chris Hayes, airing nightly at 8:00 on MSNBC, hosts a podcast called Why is this happening? Here's the summary for this particular episode:
Is it too late for us? Scientists have spent decades sounding the alarm on the devastating effects of climate change. And for decades, society decided to do pretty much nothing about it. In fact, over the past 30 years, we’ve done more damage to the climate than in all of human history! Now, there’s a real chance we may have waited too long to avoid widespread tragedy and suffering. In his book “The Uninhabitable Earth”, David Wallace-Wells depicts a catastrophic future far worse than we ever imagined...and far sooner than we thought. It is undoubtedly a brutal truth to face, as you will hear in this episode, but if there’s any hope to avert the worst case scenarios, we have to start now.

The Uninhabitable Earth with David Wallace-Wells


#environment #climatechange #globalwarming #podcast #TheUninhabitableEarth #DavidWallace-Wells
 
Mainstream media would have you believe that glaciers growing is just as bad as glaciers melting.
https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-05-02-greenland-ice-glacier-growing-as-climate-alarmists-go-into-mass-hysteria.html
#glacier #climatechange #naturalnews
 
Mainstream media would have you believe that glaciers growing is just as bad as glaciers melting.
https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-05-02-greenland-ice-glacier-growing-as-climate-alarmists-go-into-mass-hysteria.html
#glacier #climatechange #naturalnews
 

A citizens’ assembly on climate change: how would it work? | involve.org.uk

Members of the citizens’ assembly are randomly invited but selected to be demographically representative of the wider population. [...] The idea is that a citizens’ assembly looks and feels like a mini version of the wider public – they are often called 'mini-publics'. Importantly participants are not self-selected.
https://www.involve.org.uk/resources/blog/opinion/citizens-assembly-climate-change-how-would-it-work

#sortition #citizensassembly #climatechange #minipublics #deliberation #lot
 

Extinction Rebellion gridlocking London

Protesters at both locations were later removed, but police warned of disruption throughout the day.

Nine protesters also glued themselves together in a chain outside the Treasury, preventing people from the entering the Westminster building.
Wait, what the heck?
Extinction Rebellion is urging the government to "tell the truth" about the scale of the climate crisis. It wants the UK to reduce carbon emissions to net zero by 2025 and a Citizens' Assembly to oversee the changes needed to achieve that goal.

#News #Politics #Britain #GreatBritain #England #GB #UnitedKingdom #UK #London #ExtinctionRebellion #Environment #Environmentalism #Europe #ClimateChange #Europa #GlobalWarming
 
Bild/Foto
via @Fla
This comic is from June 03, 1993. I can’t believe how nothing changed.
#dilbert #ecology #planet #growing #earthday #climatechange #savetheplanet
 
Preaching for the choir here, but this a #mustWatch documentary. Yes, it's from the #BBC, and yes it's with David Attenborough. The end justifies the means! ✊

Climate Change - The Facts

:youtube:

🔐 :youtube: https://hooktube.com/watch?v=idrA1KxbkuM

📺 https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00049b1 (UK only)

:share: https://torrentz2.eu (and search)

Just share it with as many people as possible. If it opens the mind of at least one climate denier, we've done our job. 😉

#GlobalWarming #ClimateChange #ClimateJustice
 
Preaching for the choir here, but this a #mustWatch documentary. Yes, it's from the #BBC, and yes it's with David Attenborough. The end justifies the means! ✊

Climate Change - The Facts

:youtube:

🔐 :youtube: https://hooktube.com/watch?v=idrA1KxbkuM

📺 https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00049b1 (UK only)

:share: https://torrentz2.eu (and search)

Just share it with as many people as possible. If it opens the mind of at least one climate denier, we've done our job. 😉

#GlobalWarming #ClimateChange #ClimateJustice
 

Save the world like Notre-Dame, says Swedish activist Greta Thunberg



"Well, our house is falling apart and yet nothing is happening. We’ll have to switch to cathedral mode. I ask you to wake up and do what is necessary,” she said.

#climatechange
 

Save the world like Notre-Dame, says Swedish activist Greta Thunberg



"Well, our house is falling apart and yet nothing is happening. We’ll have to switch to cathedral mode. I ask you to wake up and do what is necessary,” she said.

#climatechange
 
Hello all; I’m #newhere. I got here via Sola, which just closed, at Morgaine’s recommendation. I’m a therapist in Canada.

I’m mostly interested in #politics and the #environment / #climatechange. Also #science, #mentalhealth and any number of other things; I imagine I’ll figure it out as I go along.
 
Hello all; I’m #newhere. I got here via Sola, which just closed, at Morgaine’s recommendation. I’m a therapist in Canada.

I’m mostly interested in #politics and the #environment / #climatechange. Also #science, #mentalhealth and any number of other things; I imagine I’ll figure it out as I go along.
 
Would you say Al Gore uses pseudoscience?

Bild/Foto Northern Invader - about 10 hours ago
... current existential climate threat. If anything he [Al Gore] has understated the immediacy of the threat of #climatechange.

I was wondering how you justify the following points?


http://www.johnstonsarchive.net/environment/gore.html

Executive summary:
Al Gore’s new book and movie, both titled An Inconvenient Truth, have been hailed by environmentalists–despite being filled with false or misleading claims about the science of global warming and related issues. This page details errors in the book (2006, Rodale Books), which in summary include:

* Misleading links between weather events and climate change: Climate is the average of weather conditions over long time periods; because the climate system is inherently variable, individual weather events are not indicative of trends. Nonetheless, Gore overwhelms the reader with many individual events, claiming this is global warming in action: a European heatwave, record daily highs in U.S. cities one summer, hurricane Katrina, floods in Europe and China, and more. To address the issue of climate change, all such events must be considered over time. As it turns out, in several cases such analysis refutes any claims of recent trends (for example, with regard to floods).
  • In other cases, the scientific community is engaged in much research and debate. Gore claims that there is “an emerging consensus” that hurricane activity is on the upswing due to global warming. The reality is that this is the subject of much debate in the scientific community: different researchers have produced contradictory conclusions, but the factors involved are far more complex than Gore admits, and research is continuing.
* Misrepresentation of data: Of the various graphs and other data Gore presents, some of it is misrepresented. Gore presents one graph, said to be temperature data derived from ice cores, to support the controversial claim of one research group–Mann et al.–that current temperatures are higher than anytime in the last 1,000 years. The graph is not the ice core data, however, but the Mann et al. data derived from tree rings and other proxies. The broader claim is questioned by many scientists as well–much research suggests that temperatures around 1100-1300 AD were about as warm as today–as well as the methodology used to support such claims. Gore uses another set of ice core data to claim that carbon dioxide concentrations have driven global temperatures for the last 600,000 years. He admits the actual relationship is “complicated”, which is as close as he comes to admitting the fact that the temperature changes came first, and probably helped drive the carbon dioxide changes.
  • These aren’t the only cases of sloppiness with data: Gore claims the hottest year on record was 2005, but in reality existing observations don’t have the accuracy to discriminate between, say, 2005 and 1998, a hot year due to an extreme El Nino event. He claims that the increasing closures of the barrier’s on Britain’s Thames River show sea level is rising, but doesn’t mention that the British government recently changed the rules for such closures, including closing the barriers to deal with low sea level; and he claims that a particular bird species is “in trouble” in the Netherlands due to climate change, but researchers report no change in this bird population. He cites a peak in tornadoes in 2004 as further evidence, but this peak came from new technology permitting the counting of more weak tornadoes than ever before; comparison of consistent data shows no trends in tornadoes.
* Exaggerations about sea level rise: Gore claims that potential melting of ice sheets in Greenland and West Antarctic will force the “evacuation” of millions of people to escape sea level rise of 6 meters (20 feet). This flatly contradicts even the worst-case scenarios described by the scientific community. Most research indicates that such melting, even if it could occur, would take 1,000 to 5,000 years; the minimum timescale described by any researcher for such melting is still centuries. Even the United Nations’ IPCC, source of the “consensus” analysis which still overestimates future warming, only predicts sea level rise of 0.1 to 0.8 meters (4 to 30 inches) in the next 100 years.
  • Misleading claims about effects of climate change: Gore claims that the emergence of new diseases is related to global warming, but most of the diseases he lists have little or no relationship to climate. Even in the case of malaria, a disease with a stronger link to climate, health experts cite the management of human infrastructure and health systems as far more important factors. In other cases Gore neglects the strong influence of human resource management, as with linking occurrence of wildfires or pest outbreaks to global warming. He also claims global warming is causing a “significant” number of polar bear drownings, based on a report of four drowned polar bears; however, other researchers report the polar bear population is generally unchanged. Melting of glaciers on Mount Kilimanjaro and in Glacier National Park are cited as consequences of global warming, but in both cases these glaciers have been melting since the 1800s, when the Earth emerged from a period of global cooling.
* Reliance on worst-case scenarios: An underlying problem is that Gore seizes upon worst-case scenarios and presents them as fact–sometimes omitting important qualifiers. Much of the claims about the consequences of future global warming rely on climate models that Gore calls “evermore accurate”, but significant questions about the reliability of these models remain, and the effects cited by Gore presume that the worse-case predictions of these models are the correct ones. More generally, climate change should be considered at the regional or local level, where impacts would variously be positive or negative–especially depending on how we choose to respond. Gore consistently discusses the most negative impacts, and even minimizes the possibility of positive change.
  • False claims about scientific views on global warming: Gore asserts that the scientific community is in essentially unanimous agreement with his interpretation of global warming, and dismisses skepticism of global warming as an energy industry conspiracy. Not only are such claims false, they severely misrepresent the very process of science. Gore cites a flawed editorial from a science journal to claim that all published research agrees with the “consensus” view on global warming; in reality, much published research contradicts Gore’s position on global warming, and a recent survey of climate scientists found the community fairly split on the claim that there is an imminent threat from human-caused global warming. Despite the abundance of scientific research contradicting his position, Gore instead concentrates on refuting a handful of skeptical claims from outside the scientific community–and can’t even get the facts right on those. To add insult to injury, Gore repeatedly impugns the motives of scientists and non-scientists who question his “consensus” on global warming. Rather than confront the scientific facts, he stereotypes the critics and dismisses them based on imagined motives.
* Misleading claims about the responsibility of the United States: Gore says the United States is particularly to blame for the claimed global warming crisis, but doesn’t give a fair view of the issues. He makes misleading comparisons of fuel economy standards in the U.S. and other countries; also, he criticizes the U.S. failure to ratify the Kyoto Protocol without acknowledging the ways in which the Protocol disproportionately targeted the U.S. economy. He also understates the economic adjustments required to attain the goals he sets.
  • Conceptual errors: Gore’s explanation of several topics, including the greenhouse effect, the relationship of carbon dioxide and global temperature, decline in Arctic Ocean pack ice, structure of the Greenland ice sheet, and ozone depletion, contain conceptual errors. He may indeed have a correct understanding of these issues, but what he communicates serves to perpetuate misconceptions on these subjects. Combined with the low reading level of the text, this tends to convey the lowest expectations of his readers.
* Gore’s portrayal of the subject of global warming is scientifically unsupportable; even some scientists who accept the premise of global warming have been willing to call him on some errors. His portrayal of scientific skepticism regarding global warming is shameful; science requires healthy criticism to progress. The effect of attempts by Gore and others to silence dissent is harmful to scientific understanding as well as its application by society. The effort to use such twisted science to further a political agenda is such a harm."
 
Not if you are talking about his views on #globalwarming. I have no idea what else he may believe and whatever those beliefs are they do not negate his views on our current existential climate threat. If anything he has understated the immediacy of the threat of #climatechange.
 

Transportstrom unterbrochen


Immer weniger frisches, vor #Russland entstandenes Meereis gelangt in die zentrale Arktis. Die Folge ist, dass weniger Mineralien transportiert werden. #climatechange http://www.taz.de/Kinderstube-fuer-arktisches-Meereis/!5584602/ … #taz #tazgezwitscher #tageszeitung
 
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