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Perdue on climate change: "It rained yesterday, it's a nice pretty day today"

Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue told CNN that he believes human-caused climate change is just a result of changes in weather, stating: "You know, I think it's weather patterns. ... It rained yesterday, it's a nice pretty day today. So the climate does change in short increments and in long increments."
#politics #climatechange #globalwarming #SonnyPerdue #Republicans #denial #MORON
 

Researchers: Bitcoin's Carbon Footprint Equal To Las Vegas | AP

he virtual currency bitcoin is responsible for the same amount of carbon dioxide emissions as a city like Las Vegas or Hamburg and efforts to reduce its climate footprint should be considered, researchers said Thursday.

A study by researchers at the Technical University of Munich and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, examined how much power is consumed by computers used to generate bitcoins and process transactions.

#bitcoin #cryptocurrency #carbon #globalwarming #climatechange
 
Ten years ago, Al Gore warned the North Polar Ice cap would be gone by the year 2013… hint: It’s still there.
https://www.brighteon.com/6045446879001
#climatechange #globalwarming #hoax #naturalnews
 
Ten years ago, Al Gore warned the North Polar Ice cap would be gone by the year 2013… hint: It’s still there.
https://www.brighteon.com/6045446879001
#climatechange #globalwarming #hoax #naturalnews
 
FACING THE FUTURE

The Globe and Mail
Editorial by Arno Kopecky

It’s no longer a question of arcane data telling us sea levels are rising by 1.5 millimetres a year, or that global temperatures have risen 0.8 to 1.2 degrees since 1850. It’s the smoke in your face, the canoe floating in your driveway. Soon, it’ll be the climate refugee next door.

Ear­lier this month, Arno Kopecky trav­elled across the coun­try to help his mother-in-law save her home from flood­ing. What he en­coun­tered was the first cli­mate dis­as­ter to strike Canada this year, and a glimpse of what’s to come

Ear­lier this month, Arno Kopecky trav­elled across the coun­try to help his mother-in-law save her home from flood­ing. What he en­coun­tered was the first cli­mate dis­as­ter to strike Canada this year, and a glimpse of what’s to come

Arno Kopecky is the aut­hor of The Devil’s Curve: A Journ­ey into Power and Profit at the Amaz­on’s Edge and The Oil Man and the Sea: Navi­g­ati­ng the Northe­rn Gatew­ay.

Two weeks ago, I flew across the countr­y to see what used to be known as a natur­a­l disas­te­r. The pretty brick bunga­lo­w in which my mother­in-law, Jane, and her wife, Jacquie, expe­cted to grow old, on the northwe­st tip of Montr­eal Isla­nd, had come unde­r siege, and they needed help manni­ng the barri­ca­des.

There was, and remai­ns, a long line of bellig­erent­s pressed up against the sandbag­s. Most immed­ia­te­ of these­ was the Lac Des Deux Montag­nes, which rose up on April 26 and breached the twometre­ retai­ning­ wall that normal­ly hems in their backyar­d. Behin­d the lake, swelling its assau­lt, is the Ottaw­a River; behin­d the river is the vast water­she­d of the Lauren­tia­ns, caked with a long winter­’s record snowpac­k; and on top of all that fell the April rains, 150 per cent to 250 per cent above avera­ge­ across the regio­n.

There was, and remai­ns, a long line of bellig­erent­s pressed up against the sandbag­s. Most immed­ia­te­ of these­ was the Lac Des Deux Montag­nes, which rose up on April 26 and breached the twometre­ retai­ning­ wall that normal­ly hems in their backyar­d. Behin­d the lake, swelling its assau­lt, is the Ottaw­a River; behin­d the river is the vast water­she­d of the Lauren­tia­ns, caked with a long winter­’s record snowpac­k; and on top of all that fell the April rains, 150 per cent to 250 per cent above avera­ge­ across the regio­n.

By the time I flew in from Vancouv­er ­on May 3, the deluge ­had forced 10,000 Quebeck­ers ­from their homes, along with thousand­s more in Ontari­o, Manitob­a­ and New Brunswick – but not the two retire­es living ­on Boulevard­ Gouin Ouest.

They’ve been through this before.­ The stress of the 2017 flood shaved 15 pounds off Jacquie’s spare frame and pushed Jane into retirem­ent ­(a family d­octor, ­she’d converte­d the basement ­into a clinic that succumbe­d to the rising g­roundwater­).­ That perfect ­storm was describ­ed as a once-ina-century ­flood. Let’s call this one what it is: the first climate ­disaster­ t­o hit Canada in 2019.

They’ve been through this before.­ The stress of the 2017 flood shaved 15 pounds off Jacquie’s spare frame and pushed Jane into retirem­ent ­(a family d­octor, ­she’d converte­d the basement ­into a clinic that succumbe­d to the rising g­roundwater­).­ That perfect ­storm was describ­ed as a once-ina-century ­flood. Let’s call this one what it is: the first climate ­disaster­ t­o hit Canada in 2019.

There are factors b­eyond c­limate c­hange at play. Chief among them is our relentle­ss e­xpansio­n o­f urban an­d agricultur­al ­infrastr­uct­ure. ­Each year, we plow and pave over more of the land’s absorpti­ve c­apacity­, f­orcing ev­er more rain and meltwater in­to overburden­ed ­arteries­ an­d basins. At the same time, we keep building fa­rther i­nto floodplains­ whose exposure­ k­eeps getting w­orse. Just ask your local in­surer,­ or increasi­ngly,­ your local le­vel of governmen­t –­ while I was at Jane and Jacquie’s, it was reported­ that Montreal-­area municipa­lit­i­es ­h­ave new flood maps at their disposal,­ but are not making th­em publicly ­available a­t this time. Time for some hard talk on liabilit­y­.

There are factors b­eyond c­limate c­hange at play. Chief among them is our relentle­ss e­xpansio­n o­f urban an­d agricultur­al ­infrastr­uct­ure. ­Each year, we plow and pave over more of the land’s absorpti­ve c­apacity­, f­orcing ev­er more rain and meltwater in­to overburden­ed ­arteries­ an­d basins. At the same time, we keep building fa­rther i­nto floodplains­ whose exposure­ k­eeps getting w­orse. Just ask your local in­surer,­ or increasi­ngly,­ your local le­vel of governmen­t –­ while I was at Jane and Jacquie’s, it was reported­ that Montreal-­area municipa­lit­i­es ­h­ave new flood maps at their disposal,­ but are not making th­em publicly ­available a­t this time. Time for some hard talk on liabilit­y­.

B­ut here’s the thing about climate ch­ange: It amplifies­ ev­ery eco­logical­ mi­s­take ou­r species ever made. In this case, consider t­hat Quebec’s s­pring precipitat­ion­ ­ha­s increased­ by 20 per cent over the past 50 years, according­ to a recent fe­deral re­port ca­lled Canada’s Changing Cli­mate. U­nder a b­est-case scenario o­f aggressiv­e cl­imate ac­tion, t­he same report fo­recast a ­further 7-­per-cent increase ­in annual pr­ecipitat­ion­ ­fo­r the province by­ 2050. Jane and Jacquie’s home was built in 1930 as a summer cab­in; it had been raised and renovated ­b­y the time Jacquie bought it in 1995. As they are painfully aware, it sits on a mini-floodplain –­ spring has always su­mmoned t­he prospect of a leaky basement. B­ut it wasn’t until 201­7, and then again three weeks ago, that the lake leapt two metres an­d turned their neighbourhoo­d in­to a Louisiana bayou.

B­ut here’s the thing about climate ch­ange: It amplifies­ ev­ery eco­logical­ mi­s­take ou­r species ever made. In this case, consider t­hat Quebec’s s­pring precipitat­ion­ ­ha­s increased­ by 20 per cent over the past 50 years, according­ to a recent fe­deral re­port ca­lled Canada’s Changing Cli­mate. U­nder a b­est-case scenario o­f aggressiv­e cl­imate ac­tion, t­he same report fo­recast a ­further 7-­per-cent increase ­in annual pr­ecipitat­ion­ ­fo­r the province by­ 2050. Jane and Jacquie’s home was built in 1930 as a summer cab­in; it had been raised and renovated ­b­y the time Jacquie bought it in 1995. As they are painfully aware, it sits on a mini-floodplain –­ spring has always su­mmoned t­he prospect of a leaky basement. B­ut it wasn’t until 201­7, and then again three weeks ago, that the lake leapt two metres an­d turned their neighbourhoo­d in­to a Louisiana bayou.

You could name a dozen contributin­g fact­ors for­ how this came to pass. But if you’re looking for ­a single term­ that wraps them all together, ­well, there happens to ­be one at the ready.

It was still raining when ­Jane picked me up from the airport. We ­drove west across a peri-urban lands­cape tha­t showed no sign of distress wha­tsoever, u­nt­il we tu­rned a corner and t­he road disappeared ­in­to black water. From­ there, we advanced in­ hip waders, strolling heavily throu­gh kneedeep murk. Jane pointed out which of the houses we passed had been abandoned, wh­ich were damaged but ­still occupied an­d ­which remained un­scathed. These discr­epancie­s, s­he­ noted quietly, had­ not done wonders for ­neighbourhood ­unit­y.

It was still raining when ­Jane picked me up from the airport. We ­drove west across a peri-urban lands­cape tha­t showed no sign of distress wha­tsoever, u­nt­il we tu­rned a corner and t­he road disappeared ­in­to black water. From­ there, we advanced in­ hip waders, strolling heavily throu­gh kneedeep murk. Jane pointed out which of the houses we passed had been abandoned, wh­ich were damaged but ­still occupied an­d ­which remained un­scathed. These discr­epancie­s, s­he­ noted quietly, had­ not done wonders for ­neighbourhood ­unit­y.

We reached her own home 200 metres in. W­here the car should have been, a green canoe floate­d, tethered to th­e sandbag wall e­ncircling t­he ­house. The bags weighed more than 60 pounds each, and there were about a thousand of th­em, and Jane and Jacquie, who are 71, had built the whole thing themselves. It­ took them four days. Now water lapped­ two-thirds of the way up, and not a drop had made it through.

Over the wall, through the front door, and suddenly I was­ standing inside ­what f­elt very much like an anchored ship­ – whichever window­ you loo­ked out of, all you saw was water.

“It is­ a lot like sailing,” Jacqui­e, fierce and petite, said after we’d hug­ged hello. “Ninety-per-cent boredom and 10-p­er-cent panic.”

The primary source o­f said panic was the prospect of a failed pump. There are five of them running 24/7, an­d 10 more in reserve. If one­ of them burned out, the water table was­ so hi­gh that you only had a few moments to repl­ace it befo­re the base­ment started ­flooding. In a wor­st-case scenario – say t­he power went out and the backup generator failed­ –­ ­it was anyone’s guess h­ow long before the lake­ knocked the house off its foundation, as ha­pp­ened to the ­next-door neighbour in 2017.­

Jane and Jacquie aren’t sailors, but they had a friend on board who was: Cynthia, 58 years­ young and brimming with emer­gency prepared­ness, had­ been­ camped here since the beginning. A con­noi­sseur of we­athe­r charts and tidal flows and life-preserving protoc­ols,­ Cynthi­a ­was the r­esident interpre­t­er of f­low­-management decisi­ons­ made b­y ­the Ottawa River Reg­ulation Planni­n­g ­Board, wh­ich controls the laby­rinth of dams and reservoirs upstream­ from he­re. She was going through th­e latest forecast w­hen I ar­rived.

Jane and Jacquie aren’t sailors, but they had a friend on board who was: Cynthia, 58 years­ young and brimming with emer­gency prepared­ness, had­ been­ camped here since the beginning. A con­noi­sseur of we­athe­r charts and tidal flows and life-preserving protoc­ols,­ Cynthi­a ­was the r­esident interpre­t­er of f­low­-management decisi­ons­ made b­y ­the Ottawa River Reg­ulation Planni­n­g ­Board, wh­ich controls the laby­rinth of dams and reservoirs upstream­ from he­re. She was going through th­e latest forecast w­hen I ar­rived.

“From M­attawa down to La­c Coulonge, levels a­re expecte­d to begin­ rising agai­n over ­the next few days,” she read out. But, “below Lac Coulong­e, levels a­re expecte­d to remai­n stable or ­slowly d­ecline.” Then ag­ain, “With warmer temperatures, rese­rvo­i­rs in the Ab­itibi-Timiskaming area are ra­pidly filling with increa­sed snowmel­t runoff. In this part of the watershed, the vo­lum­e of spring r­unoff exceeds the capac­ity of most ­res­ervoirs.”

“From M­attawa down to La­c Coulonge, levels a­re expecte­d to begin­ rising agai­n over ­the next few days,” she read out. But, “below Lac Coulong­e, levels a­re expecte­d to remai­n stable or ­slowly d­ecline.” Then ag­ain, “With warmer temperatures, rese­rvo­i­rs in the Ab­itibi-Timiskaming area are ra­pidly filling with increa­sed snowmel­t runoff. In this part of the watershed, the vo­lum­e of spring r­unoff exceeds the capac­ity of most ­res­ervoirs.”

Jacquie­ absorbed the progn­ostication for ­a l­on­g ­moment before reac­hing a ­conclusion­. “It’s g­oin­g up.”

“Yeah,”­ Cynthia beamed, as t­hough looking forward to so­me acti­on, “but at lea­st I said it nicely.”

It’s a strange feeling, when somethin­g you’ve long ­dreaded finally arrives. I’v­e been w­aiting for climate ch­ange my ent­ire adult life. N­ow I’m 42, and it’s here. The fires, floods and hurricanes battering ­No­rth Ameri­ca ­these past few­ years­, more fierce and frequent than ever be­fore in recorded h­istory, are precisel­y what climat­e science has b­een pred­icting since befo­re I­ was born. O­f course, the symptoms have been app­arent for some ti­me.­ But for those of us cocooned in cities, ­it’s been harder to perceive. To feel. No­t any more. It’s no longer a question of arcane dat­a telling ­us sea levels are rising by ­1.5 millime­tres a year, o­r th­at global temperatures have ris­en ­0­.8 to 1.2 degrees since 1850. ­It’s the smoke in your face, the canoe floating in yo­ur drivew­ay. Soon, it’ll b­e the climate refugee next ­door.

It’s a strange feeling, when somethin­g you’ve long ­dreaded finally arrives. I’v­e been w­aiting for climate ch­ange my ent­ire adult life. N­ow I’m 42, and it’s here. The fires, floods and hurricanes battering ­No­rth Ameri­ca ­these past few­ years­, more fierce and frequent than ever be­fore in recorded h­istory, are precisel­y what climat­e science has b­een pred­icting since befo­re I­ was born. O­f course, the symptoms have been app­arent for some ti­me.­ But for those of us cocooned in cities, ­it’s been harder to perceive. To feel. No­t any more. It’s no longer a question of arcane dat­a telling ­us sea levels are rising by ­1.5 millime­tres a year, o­r th­at global temperatures have ris­en ­0­.8 to 1.2 degrees since 1850. ­It’s the smoke in your face, the canoe floating in yo­ur drivew­ay. Soon, it’ll b­e the climate refugee next ­door.

The United Nations predicts that­ there wi­ll be up to 200 million such refugees ­by 2050. Jane and Jacquie would be the first to say that there’s no comparison between the­ tw­o­ of th­em and the 20 million Bangladeshis l­ikely to be displaced this century­ – or closer to­ home, the 2,500 people of Kashechewan ­First Nation in Northern On­tario who’ve ­been f­orced to evacuate en masse every­ ­spring since 20­12.

The United Nations predicts that­ there wi­ll be up to 200 million such refugees ­by 2050. Jane and Jacquie would be the first to say that there’s no comparison between the­ tw­o­ of th­em and the 20 million Bangladeshis l­ikely to be displaced this century­ – or closer to­ home, the 2,500 people of Kashechewan ­First Nation in Northern On­tario who’ve ­been f­orced to evacuate en masse every­ ­spring since 20­12.

“The moms” have friends and family to help them, en­ough savings that they’re no­t going to end up in a s­oup kitchen or a camp for internally displaced p­ers­ons. Jacq­uie’s son ­lives down the road and was here every day of the emerg­ency. But they’ve b­een living in this home for­ almost a quarter-centu­ry. It has ­harbour­ed their marriag­e, their friends­, their children and their grand­children. They never­ dre­amed of leaving.

“I used to look­ out at the water and see nothing b­ut beauty,” Jacq­uie told me at one point during the weekend. “But­ now, I can’­t help seeing menace underneath­ the su­rface.­ I ­see what it c­an do.”

The anxiety of what each new ­s­pring will bring now clouds the entire year. They’re not­ getting younger. And yet,­ how can they leave? Where will they go? The provincial government cur­ren­tly offe­rs ­homeowne­rs such a­s them $2­00,­000 to abandon their houses. This­ is no mansion – it’s 1,300 squa­re feet – but that kind of buyout represents a devas­tating ­lo­ss.

The anxiety of what each new ­s­pring will bring now clouds the entire year. They’re not­ getting younger. And yet,­ how can they leave? Where will they go? The provincial government cur­ren­tly offe­rs ­homeowne­rs such a­s them $2­00,­000 to abandon their houses. This­ is no mansion – it’s 1,300 squa­re feet – but that kind of buyout represents a devas­tating ­lo­ss.

While t­he­y w­eigh unsavoury options, the re­st of the ­province, the country and t­he world are w­aking up to similar calcu­lations. You ­m­ay not ­li­ve­ on a floodplain, or beside a flam­mable forest­, or know any climat­e refugees. But your­ taxes are already being spent on th­ose thin­gs. The 2017 flood cost the Quebec government $350-mil­lion; t­his­ one was wors­e and will cost more. Canada’s federal disaster-relief fu­nd is no­w ­paying­ out more than $1-bi­llion a year, a five-fol­d increase from 10 years ag­o. These numbers barely hint­ at the­ magnitude of what’s coming­. ­Back in 2011, the ­National Round Table on t­he Environment ­and the Econo­my­ es­timated that by 2­050, c­li­mate change will cost C­anadians between $21-billi­on­ and $­43-billion a ­year. Our federa­l government’s respo­nse was ­to ­disband t­he organization.

While t­he­y w­eigh unsavoury options, the re­st of the ­province, the country and t­he world are w­aking up to similar calcu­lations. You ­m­ay not ­li­ve­ on a floodplain, or beside a flam­mable forest­, or know any climat­e refugees. But your­ taxes are already being spent on th­ose thin­gs. The 2017 flood cost the Quebec government $350-mil­lion; t­his­ one was wors­e and will cost more. Canada’s federal disaster-relief fu­nd is no­w ­paying­ out more than $1-bi­llion a year, a five-fol­d increase from 10 years ag­o. These numbers barely hint­ at the­ magnitude of what’s coming­. ­Back in 2011, the ­National Round Table on t­he Environment ­and the Econo­my­ es­timated that by 2­050, c­li­mate change will cost C­anadians between $21-billi­on­ and $­43-billion a ­year. Our federa­l government’s respo­nse was ­to ­disband t­he organization.

Eight years­ o­n,­ w­e’re at a strange juncture in Canada. Polls in­dicate that most of us a­re­ worried about climate chang­e and want som­ething to be done about i­t, yet over the past couple years, in province a­fter province, we’­ve vote­d in the­ opposite direction. The fe­de­ral opp­osi­tion depicts ­filling­ u­p ­your ga­s tank as ­a patriotic act. Then again,­ th­e Green Party’s recent near-victory in PEI­, followed by­ the election of­ a Green MP acros­s the country in Nanaimo, B.C., of­fers a hopeful counterna­rrative.

Eight years­ o­n,­ w­e’re at a strange juncture in Canada. Polls in­dicate that most of us a­re­ worried about climate chang­e and want som­ething to be done about i­t, yet over the past couple years, in province a­fter province, we’­ve vote­d in the­ opposite direction. The fe­de­ral opp­osi­tion depicts ­filling­ u­p ­your ga­s tank as ­a patriotic act. Then again,­ th­e Green Party’s recent near-victory in PEI­, followed by­ the election of­ a Green MP acros­s the country in Nanaimo, B.C., of­fers a hopeful counterna­rrative.

Ur­gency is­ in th­e ­air. We’v­e entered a brief window of o­pportunity in whi­ch abstra­ct ­cl­imate science is­ merging w­ith live­d experience­, while the apoca­ly­ps­e of three-degree wa­r­ming or worse can­ still be­ avoided. Politically, those are good­ co­n­ditions.

This fall, for t­he­ first time in Canadian history, climate chan­ge will ­be a cent­ral campaign issue in a f­ederal e­lection.­ While I’m g­lad to re­port that Jane and Jacquie­ are okay, and so is the house, I’m afraid theirs won’t be the last climate disaster to hit Canad­a before­ O­ctober.

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The Globe and Mail (Ontario Edition)Page O9
OPINION
FACING THE FUTURE
The Globe and Mail (Ontario Edition)
CHRISTINNE MUSCHI/REUTERS
Earlier this month, Arno Kopecky travelled across the country to help his mother-in-law save her home from flooding. What he encountered was the first climate disaster to strike Canada this year, and a glimpse of what’s to come

Arno Kopecky is the author of The Devil’s Curve: A Journey into Power and Profit at the Amazon’s Edge and The Oil Man and the Sea: Navigating the Northern Gateway.

Two weeks ago, I flew across the country to see what used to be known as a natural disaster. The pretty brick bungalow in which my motherin-law, Jane, and her wife, Jacquie, expected to grow old, on the northwest tip of Montreal Island, had come under siege, and they needed help manning the barricades.

There was, and remains, a long line of belligerents pressed up against the sandbags. Most immediate of these was the Lac Des Deux Montagnes, which rose up on April 26 and breached the twometre retaining wall that normally hems in their backyard. Behind the lake, swelling its assault, is the Ottawa River; behind the river is the vast watershed of the Laurentians, caked with a long winter’s record snowpack; and on top of all that fell the April rains, 150 per cent to 250 per cent above average across the region.

By the time I flew in from Vancouver on May 3, the deluge had forced 10,000 Quebeckers from their homes, along with thousands more in Ontario, Manitoba and New Brunswick – but not the two retirees living on Boulevard Gouin Ouest.

They’ve been through this before. The stress of the 2017 flood shaved 15 pounds off Jacquie’s spare frame and pushed Jane into retirement (a family doctor, she’d converted the basement into a clinic that succumbed to the rising groundwater). That perfect storm was described as a once-ina-century flood. Let’s call this one what it is: the first climate disaster to hit Canada in 2019.

There are factors beyond climate change at play. Chief among them is our relentless expansion of urban and agricultural infrastructure. Each year, we plow and pave over more of the land’s absorptive capacity, forcing ever more rain and meltwater into overburdened arteries and basins. At the same time, we keep building farther into floodplains whose exposure keeps getting worse. Just ask your local insurer, or increasingly, your local level of government – while I was at Jane and Jacquie’s, it was reported that Montreal-area municipalities have new flood maps at their disposal, but are not making them publicly available at this time. Time for some hard talk on liability.

But here’s the thing about climate change: It amplifies every ecological mistake our species ever made. In this case, consider that Quebec’s spring precipitation has increased by 20 per cent over the past 50 years, according to a recent federal report called Canada’s Changing Climate. Under a best-case scenario of aggressive climate action, the same report forecast a further 7-per-cent increase in annual precipitation for the province by 2050. Jane and Jacquie’s home was built in 1930 as a summer cabin; it had been raised and renovated by the time Jacquie bought it in 1995. As they are painfully aware, it sits on a mini-floodplain – spring has always summoned the prospect of a leaky basement. But it wasn’t until 2017, and then again three weeks ago, that the lake leapt two metres and turned their neighbourhood into a Louisiana bayou.

You could name a dozen contributing factors for how this came to pass. But if you’re looking for a single term that wraps them all together, well, there happens to be one at the ready.

It was still raining when Jane picked me up from the airport. We drove west across a peri-urban landscape that showed no sign of distress whatsoever, until we turned a corner and the road disappeared into black water. From there, we advanced in hip waders, strolling heavily through kneedeep murk. Jane pointed out which of the houses we passed had been abandoned, which were damaged but still occupied and which remained unscathed. These discrepancies, she noted quietly, had not done wonders for neighbourhood unity.

We reached her own home 200 metres in. Where the car should have been, a green canoe floated, tethered to the sandbag wall encircling the house. The bags weighed more than 60 pounds each, and there were about a thousand of them, and Jane and Jacquie, who are 71, had built the whole thing themselves. It took them four days. Now water lapped two-thirds of the way up, and not a drop had made it through.

Over the wall, through the front door, and suddenly I was standing inside what felt very much like an anchored ship – whichever window you looked out of, all you saw was water.

“It is a lot like sailing,” Jacquie, fierce and petite, said after we’d hugged hello. “Ninety-per-cent boredom and 10-per-cent panic.”

The primary source of said panic was the prospect of a failed pump. There are five of them running 24/7, and 10 more in reserve. If one of them burned out, the water table was so high that you only had a few moments to replace it before the basement started flooding. In a worst-case scenario – say the power went out and the backup generator failed – it was anyone’s guess how long before the lake knocked the house off its foundation, as happened to the next-door neighbour in 2017.

Jane and Jacquie aren’t sailors, but they had a friend on board who was: Cynthia, 58 years young and brimming with emergency preparedness, had been camped here since the beginning. A connoisseur of weather charts and tidal flows and life-preserving protocols, Cynthia was the resident interpreter of flow-management decisions made by the Ottawa River Regulation Planning Board, which controls the labyrinth of dams and reservoirs upstream from here. She was going through the latest forecast when I arrived.

“From Mattawa down to Lac Coulonge, levels are expected to begin rising again over the next few days,” she read out. But, “below Lac Coulonge, levels are expected to remain stable or slowly decline.” Then again, “With warmer temperatures, reservoirs in the Abitibi-Timiskaming area are rapidly filling with increased snowmelt runoff. In this part of the watershed, the volume of spring runoff exceeds the capacity of most reservoirs.”

Jacquie absorbed the prognostication for a long moment before reaching a conclusion. “It’s going up.”

“Yeah,” Cynthia beamed, as though looking forward to some action, “but at least I said it nicely.”

It’s a strange feeling, when something you’ve long dreaded finally arrives. I’ve been waiting for climate change my entire adult life. Now I’m 42, and it’s here. The fires, floods and hurricanes battering North America these past few years, more fierce and frequent than ever before in recorded history, are precisely what climate science has been predicting since before I was born. Of course, the symptoms have been apparent for some time. But for those of us cocooned in cities, it’s been harder to perceive. To feel. Not any more. It’s no longer a question of arcane data telling us sea levels are rising by 1.5 millimetres a year, or that global temperatures have risen 0.8 to 1.2 degrees since 1850. It’s the smoke in your face, the canoe floating in your driveway. Soon, it’ll be the climate refugee next door.

The United Nations predicts that there will be up to 200 million such refugees by 2050. Jane and Jacquie would be the first to say that there’s no comparison between the two of them and the 20 million Bangladeshis likely to be displaced this century – or closer to home, the 2,500 people of Kashechewan First Nation in Northern Ontario who’ve been forced to evacuate en masse every spring since 2012.

“The moms” have friends and family to help them, enough savings that they’re not going to end up in a soup kitchen or a camp for internally displaced persons. Jacquie’s son lives down the road and was here every day of the emergency. But they’ve been living in this home for almost a quarter-century. It has harboured their marriage, their friends, their children and their grandchildren. They never dreamed of leaving.

“I used to look out at the water and see nothing but beauty,” Jacquie told me at one point during the weekend. “But now, I can’t help seeing menace underneath the surface. I see what it can do.”

The anxiety of what each new spring will bring now clouds the entire year. They’re not getting younger. And yet, how can they leave? Where will they go? The provincial government currently offers homeowners such as them $200,000 to abandon their houses. This is no mansion – it’s 1,300 square feet – but that kind of buyout represents a devastating loss.

While they weigh unsavoury options, the rest of the province, the country and the world are waking up to similar calculations. You may not live on a floodplain, or beside a flammable forest, or know any climate refugees. But your taxes are already being spent on those things. The 2017 flood cost the Quebec government $350-million; this one was worse and will cost more. Canada’s federal disaster-relief fund is now paying out more than $1-billion a year, a five-fold increase from 10 years ago. These numbers barely hint at the magnitude of what’s coming. Back in 2011, the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy estimated that by 2050, climate change will cost Canadians between $21-billion and $43-billion a year. Our federal government’s response was to disband the organization.

Eight years on, we’re at a strange juncture in Canada. Polls indicate that most of us are worried about climate change and want something to be done about it, yet over the past couple years, in province after province, we’ve voted in the opposite direction. The federal opposition depicts filling up your gas tank as a patriotic act. Then again, the Green Party’s recent near-victory in PEI, followed by the election of a Green MP across the country in Nanaimo, B.C., offers a hopeful counternarrative.

Urgency is in the air. We’ve entered a brief window of opportunity in which abstract climate science is merging with lived experience, while the apocalypse of three-degree warming or worse can still be avoided. Politically, those are good conditions.

This fall, for the first time in Canadian history, climate change will be a central campaign issue in a federal election. While I’m glad to report that Jane and Jacquie are okay, and so is the house, I’m afraid theirs won’t be the last climate disaster to hit Canada before October.

#news #climatechange #globalwarming #Canada #politics #editorial
 

The planet is on fucking fire!


#climatechange #globalwarming #BillNye
 
Satellite data No real increase in global warming for the last 23 years

#globalwarming #climatechange #hoax #naturalnews
 

Bolsonaro's government lost fight against SC and opposition to remove protection from rain forest

Taken together, this means that Bolsonaro’s signature action to start the rollback of indigenous territories and declare open season on Amazon deforestation – which needs both congressional and judicial approval to fly – looks to be crashing on takeoff. It’s also a glimmer of hope for indigenous and environmental protections in a country now led by a president openly hostile to Brazil’s indigenous peoples and Amazon rainforest – repositories of its vast social and biological diversity, and key to stabilizing the global climate.

On its first day in office, the Bolsonaro administration decided in executive action MP 870 to remove the authority to legally recognize and physically demarcate indigenous lands from the National Indian Foundation (FUNAI) and give it to the Ministry of Agriculture, Ranching and Supply (MAPA). MAPA is controlled by politicians affiliated with the anti-indigenous agriculture caucus of the congress bent on expanding their lands into the rainforests that belong to indigenous communities. Destroying these rainforests will have devastating effects not only for indigenous communities, but for the world’s climate.

#LatinAmerica #SouthAmerica #Brazil #Bolsonaro #RainForest #AmazonRegion #Amazon #IndigenousPeople #GlobalWarming #News #Politics #Environmentalism #Environment #Economy #Economics #Capitalism #Corporatism #CapitalismKills #CorporatismKills #Nationalism #Patriotism #Trump #DonaldTrump #NoNationalism #NoPatriotism
Indigenous Mobilization Wins Battle in President Bolsonaro’s War on Indigenous Peoples
 

Grünen-Chef Robert Habeck kritisiert teuren Preis für E-Wagen von VW

"Wenn Sie 2025 kein E-Mobil für unter 20.000 Euro anbieten, dann werden Sie - so fürchte ich - im Markt scheitern." Dann müsse sich VW konzentrieren auf Porsches und SUV und sei nicht mehr Volkswagen. "Dann bieten Sie nur noch Premiumwagen an und müssten sich in PW umbenennen", sagte der Grünenpolitiker.
Das Problem ist auch, dass der Preis sich so schnell nicht nach unten regulieren wird, wenn zeitgleich auch noch die teureren Verbrenner vom Bande laufen, und auch noch erschwinglicher bleiben. Stattdessen manifestiert sich dann das Bild vom teuren Verbrenner und dem Luxusautomobil, welcher allein mit Strom fährt. Habecks Kritik ist also berechtigt.
Von den Neuzulassungen werden mehr als 60 Prozent auf gewerbliche Halter zugelassen, ein Teil dient als Dienstwagen. Die niedrige pauschale Besteuerung von Dienstwagen ist ein Anreiz für Arbeitgeber, einen Teil des Gehalts in dieser Form auszuzahlen. Als Kompensation für die höhere Kfz-Steuer für Diesel wird Dieseltreibstoff geringer besteuert als Benzin. Umweltschützer errechnen daraus einen "jährlichen Steuerausfall von gut sieben Milliarden Euro".

#Deutschland #News #Politik #Klimawandel #GlobalWarming #GlobaleErwärmung #Environment #Environmentalism #Umwelt #Habeck #Grüne #Bündnis90 #Umweltschutz
 

UN Report attests environment worst shape in human history

More than half a million species on land "have insufficient habitat for long-term survival" and are likely to go extinct, many within decades, unless their habitats are restored, and the oceans are not any better off, the report adds.

The Call4Nature letter, published as the G7 group of leading nations' environment ministers meet in France, says: "Nature provides us with the food we eat, the air we breathe and the water we drink.

The findings are not just about saving plants and animals, but about preserving a world that's becoming harder for humans to live in, said Robert Watson, a former top NASA and British scientist who headed the report.

#IPCC #IPBES #Global #Globalization #Environment #Environmentalism #News #Politics #Europe #G7 #US #USA #ClimateChange #GlobalWarming #Trump #DonaldTrump #ClimateChangeDenial
 
Woohoo! I just learned that author Michael Lewis is going to be a guest on Real Time With Bill Maher next Friday! Those of you who follow me will know that yesterday I posted a link to Chris Hayes's podcast featuring Michael Lewis illuminating his views on how Donald Trump has negatively affected the operation of the U.S. federal government.

It seems that every week I let out a squeal when I see who Bill's guests are going to be on the next show. Last week I let out a woot when I saw Jay Inslee's name. And he did not disappoint. He's one of my front runners for the nomination for the Democratic party. That dude is all in on addressing climate change. It's his number one issue. And he's got receipts! He's enacted and is enacting all sorts of measures in Washington state to deal with CC and he's got big ideas for the country.

#politics #RealTime #BillMaher #MichaelLewis #climatechange #globalwarming #JayInslee
 

Podcast Recommendation


One good thing about road trips is the opportunity to listen to podcasts without interruption or distraction (other than, uh, you know, the driving). Here's one I enjoyed very much today and thought you might too. Chris Hayes from All In With Chris Hayes, airing nightly at 8:00 on MSNBC, hosts a podcast called Why is this happening? Here's the summary for this particular episode:
Is it too late for us? Scientists have spent decades sounding the alarm on the devastating effects of climate change. And for decades, society decided to do pretty much nothing about it. In fact, over the past 30 years, we’ve done more damage to the climate than in all of human history! Now, there’s a real chance we may have waited too long to avoid widespread tragedy and suffering. In his book “The Uninhabitable Earth”, David Wallace-Wells depicts a catastrophic future far worse than we ever imagined...and far sooner than we thought. It is undoubtedly a brutal truth to face, as you will hear in this episode, but if there’s any hope to avert the worst case scenarios, we have to start now.

The Uninhabitable Earth with David Wallace-Wells


#environment #climatechange #globalwarming #podcast #TheUninhabitableEarth #DavidWallace-Wells
 
#globalwarming #heatisland #treecanopy #urbanareas

"The idea of the heat island -- that densely built-up urban areas are considerably hotter than the rural and semi-rural landscapes that surround them -- has been extensively studied and is widely accepted by academics and the public.

But a new study by a Concordia researcher takes a closer look at the phenomenon and what can be done to mitigate it. According to Carly Ziter, an assistant professor of biology in the Faculty of Arts and Science, extensive tree canopy cover in an urban area can dramatically reduce the temperatures of their immediate environs -- enough to make a significant difference even within a few city blocks.

In a new paper published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Ziter argues that there is a non-linear relationship between canopy cover and temperature reduction: when canopy cover reaches a certain threshold, temperatures will begin to drop far more dramatically than they do below that point.

"We found that to get the most cooling, you have to have about 40 per cent canopy cover, and this was strongest around the scale of a city block," she says. "So if your neighbourhood has less than 40 per cent canopy cover, you'll get a little bit of cooling, but not very much. Once you tip over that threshold, you really see large increases in how much you can cool areas off."

She adds that the difference between areas with heavy canopy cover and those that are treeless can be as high as four or five degrees Celsius, even within just a few hundred metres of each other.

The effects of shading contribute to that decrease but are not the only factor.

"Trees transpire," she explains. "They give off water vapour, almost like a little air conditioner."

This transpiration occurs mainly during the day. Her research shows that during nighttime there is a much smaller difference in temperature between areas with significant canopy cover and those without".

City trees can offset neighborhood heat islands, Concordia researcher says | EurekAlert! Science News #ViaDiasporaNativeWebApp
 
#globalwarming #heatisland #treecanopy #urbanareas

"The idea of the heat island -- that densely built-up urban areas are considerably hotter than the rural and semi-rural landscapes that surround them -- has been extensively studied and is widely accepted by academics and the public.

But a new study by a Concordia researcher takes a closer look at the phenomenon and what can be done to mitigate it. According to Carly Ziter, an assistant professor of biology in the Faculty of Arts and Science, extensive tree canopy cover in an urban area can dramatically reduce the temperatures of their immediate environs -- enough to make a significant difference even within a few city blocks.

In a new paper published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Ziter argues that there is a non-linear relationship between canopy cover and temperature reduction: when canopy cover reaches a certain threshold, temperatures will begin to drop far more dramatically than they do below that point.

"We found that to get the most cooling, you have to have about 40 per cent canopy cover, and this was strongest around the scale of a city block," she says. "So if your neighbourhood has less than 40 per cent canopy cover, you'll get a little bit of cooling, but not very much. Once you tip over that threshold, you really see large increases in how much you can cool areas off."

She adds that the difference between areas with heavy canopy cover and those that are treeless can be as high as four or five degrees Celsius, even within just a few hundred metres of each other.

The effects of shading contribute to that decrease but are not the only factor.

"Trees transpire," she explains. "They give off water vapour, almost like a little air conditioner."

This transpiration occurs mainly during the day. Her research shows that during nighttime there is a much smaller difference in temperature between areas with significant canopy cover and those without".

City trees can offset neighborhood heat islands, Concordia researcher says | EurekAlert! Science News #ViaDiasporaNativeWebApp
 

Extinction Rebellion gridlocking London

Protesters at both locations were later removed, but police warned of disruption throughout the day.

Nine protesters also glued themselves together in a chain outside the Treasury, preventing people from the entering the Westminster building.
Wait, what the heck?
Extinction Rebellion is urging the government to "tell the truth" about the scale of the climate crisis. It wants the UK to reduce carbon emissions to net zero by 2025 and a Citizens' Assembly to oversee the changes needed to achieve that goal.

#News #Politics #Britain #GreatBritain #England #GB #UnitedKingdom #UK #London #ExtinctionRebellion #Environment #Environmentalism #Europe #ClimateChange #Europa #GlobalWarming
 
Preaching for the choir here, but this a #mustWatch documentary. Yes, it's from the #BBC, and yes it's with David Attenborough. The end justifies the means! ✊

Climate Change - The Facts

:youtube:

🔐 :youtube: https://hooktube.com/watch?v=idrA1KxbkuM

📺 https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00049b1 (UK only)

:share: https://torrentz2.eu (and search)

Just share it with as many people as possible. If it opens the mind of at least one climate denier, we've done our job. 😉

#GlobalWarming #ClimateChange #ClimateJustice
 
Preaching for the choir here, but this a #mustWatch documentary. Yes, it's from the #BBC, and yes it's with David Attenborough. The end justifies the means! ✊

Climate Change - The Facts

:youtube:

🔐 :youtube: https://hooktube.com/watch?v=idrA1KxbkuM

📺 https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00049b1 (UK only)

:share: https://torrentz2.eu (and search)

Just share it with as many people as possible. If it opens the mind of at least one climate denier, we've done our job. 😉

#GlobalWarming #ClimateChange #ClimateJustice
 
The Ozone Layer is formed dynamically, when less or no chloride material shot into this layer, it recovers accordingly.
Chloride material has to be shot regularly into the ozone layer to deplete ozone and increase the irradiance and get **more solar energy **onto the surface of oceans and sweet water basins like the arctic ice and Antarctica ice cap, plus the glacier areas like the Himalayas or the Alps.

More heat evaporates more water into the Weather-Climate System. This water is supplied to the fracking and desert farming industries!

The Primary Cause of Global #Warming is #Ozone Depletion
http://ozonedepletiontheory.info/primary-cause-of-warming.html
#Climate #Geoengineering #SRM #haarp #globalwarming #climatecontrol
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D3vaxTOWkAAv822.jpg
 
The Ozone Layer is formed dynamically, when less or no chloride material shot into this layer, it recovers accordingly.
Chloride material has to be shot regularly into the ozone layer to deplete ozone and increase the irradiance and get **more solar energy **onto the surface of oceans and sweet water basins like the arctic ice and Antarctica ice cap, plus the glacier areas like the Himalayas or the Alps.

More heat evaporates more water into the Weather-Climate System. This water is supplied to the fracking and desert farming industries!

The Primary Cause of Global #Warming is #Ozone Depletion
http://ozonedepletiontheory.info/primary-cause-of-warming.html
#Climate #Geoengineering #SRM #haarp #globalwarming #climatecontrol
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D3vaxTOWkAAv822.jpg
 
#globalwarming #snowmelt #alaska

"Unusually high March temperatures lopped weeks off Alaska's long winter and reflect a warming climate trend, state climate experts say.

March is normally reliable for dog mushing and cross-country skiing. However, extreme warmth melted snow and made ice on waterways hazardous for travel in the state. Anchorage, Alaska's largest city, didn't record a flake of measureable snow.

"It was as if we didn't have March this year," said Martin Stuefer, state climatologist and an associate research professor with the Alaska Climate Research Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. "We had April instead."

Researchers don't make climate conclusions based on a month's data, but Alaska's warm March reflects an upward warming climate trend in America's largest state, Stuefer said.

"We see the last several years were way warm. There's a clear climate-induced warming. There's no doubt about it," he said.

The March warmth was due to a high pressure ridge over Alaska and northwest Alaska that lasted two weeks. Low pressure over the Bering Sea produced southwest winds along Alaska's west coast, pushing warm air from southern latitudes into the Arctic, according to Stuefer".

#ViaDiasporaNativeWebApp
 
#globalwarming #snowmelt #alaska

"Unusually high March temperatures lopped weeks off Alaska's long winter and reflect a warming climate trend, state climate experts say.

March is normally reliable for dog mushing and cross-country skiing. However, extreme warmth melted snow and made ice on waterways hazardous for travel in the state. Anchorage, Alaska's largest city, didn't record a flake of measureable snow.

"It was as if we didn't have March this year," said Martin Stuefer, state climatologist and an associate research professor with the Alaska Climate Research Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. "We had April instead."

Researchers don't make climate conclusions based on a month's data, but Alaska's warm March reflects an upward warming climate trend in America's largest state, Stuefer said.

"We see the last several years were way warm. There's a clear climate-induced warming. There's no doubt about it," he said.

The March warmth was due to a high pressure ridge over Alaska and northwest Alaska that lasted two weeks. Low pressure over the Bering Sea produced southwest winds along Alaska's west coast, pushing warm air from southern latitudes into the Arctic, according to Stuefer".

#ViaDiasporaNativeWebApp
 
Not if you are talking about his views on #globalwarming. I have no idea what else he may believe and whatever those beliefs are they do not negate his views on our current existential climate threat. If anything he has understated the immediacy of the threat of #climatechange.
 

On AOC and the Republicans

Vox:

Three prior surveys — one in January from Morning Consult, one in February from Fox, and a third in mid-March from Gallup — all found that more Americans had negative views of AOC than had positive ones. This might surprise a lot of Democrats, who see all of her viral clips and impressive performances in congressional hearings and assume she’s a popular rising star.

A large number of Democrats — 44 percent — haven’t heard enough about her to have an opinion. A much smaller percentage of Republicans — 23 percent — can say the same. AOC is simply better known among Republicans than Democrats, and this is driving her unfavorables up.
Does knowledge determine towards dislike with her, or do those same Republicans only believe they know enough of her to have such an unfavourable opinion of her? I mean, they surely would claim prejudices information, or at least don’t know that they fell for sole prejudices._
It turns out she got more coverage on Fox than any candidate save one, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who is also a right-wing boogeyman. Ocasio-Cortez got significantly more Fox News coverage than fellow democratic socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders.

USA TODAY:

"Think about the fact that every mainstream leading Democratic contender is taking the advice of a freshmen congresswoman who three weeks ago didn’t know the three branches of government," Drumpf Jr. told the crowd as he discussed Ocasio-Cortez’s Green New Deal, a climate change bill that failed in the Senate this week.
To what does he refer specifically? Because I guess that his father didn’t know the three branches, or at least couldn’t care less about them so that he signed EOs to overcome the Congress. Nice try, dude, but she knows the governmental work better than your father, because he simply bought into the whole process, while he couldn’t even win a seat in the Senate when he first ran for the Republican party in California, back in the 90’s.
"What about brilliant policies like the Green New Deal?" Drumpf Jr. asked the crowd. "What’s scarier about the Green New Deal is that every mainstream Democrat leading presidential contender is like ‘this is a great idea!’"
What does he see as the mainstream? Sounds to me like a blatant buzzword to hide one’s own void in regards to content. But what does one expect from a semi-professional troll?
#US #USA #Trump #DonaldTrumpJr #News #Politics #Election #GeneralElection #Election2020 #Elections2020 #Michigan #GrandRapids #AOC #AlexandriaOcasioCortez #OcasioCortez #Environment #Environmentalism #GlobalWarming #ClimateChange #GreenNewDeal #HRes109 #Republican #RedWave #BlueWave #Democrats #Politics #News
 
Bild/Foto

Related to the Ben Shapiro interview I read yesterday


A meme I also found yesterday, somewhere on Twitter in the comment section of a random Trump tweet, also known as Donald's Divine Comedy. Needless to say that one can be sure Ms. Ocasio-Cortez would be flattered to hear it from him. ;-)
#US #USA #Politics #TurningPointUSA #TPUSA #Shapiro #BenShapiro #GlobalWarming #ClimateChange #Environment #Environmentalism #GreenNewDeal #HRes109 #OcasioCortez #AlexandriaOcasioCortez #AOC #Meme
 

«I've got a better idea on how to fight climate change», insists Lamar Alexander (R - TN)

So, as one Republican, I propose this response to climate change: the United States should launch a New Manhattan Project for Clean Energy, a five-year project to meet Ten Grand Challenges that will use American research and technology to put our country and the world firmly on a path toward cleaner, cheaper energy.
I already thought he planned to nuke climate change away. Good to know he just wants to crate a ten-year plan on preparing the US for an environmentally friendlier surrounding. Unfortunately, we don't have ten years to prepare ourselves, we should've prepared for this at least twenty years ago.
This strategy recognizes that, when it comes to climate change, China, India and other developing countries are the problem; American innovation is the answer. According to the Global Carbon Project, over the last 13 years, the United States has reduced production of greenhouse gases more than any major country – largely thanks to conservation and switching from coal to natural gas for electricity.

#US #USA #Alexander #LamarAlexander #News #Politics #News #Politics #ClimateChange #GlobalWarming #Environment #Environmentalism #CarbonEmissions #TechnologyAdvance
 

Sen. Mike Lee (R - UT) - the aftermath of inbreeding?

Likewise, Lee said he is not afraid of the Green New Deal because he doesn’t believe it will pass. Lee then unveiled the above image of President Ronald Reagan riding a velociraptor holding an American flag, and it all went downhill from there.
Ronald Reagan riding a velociraptor while holding the Stars & Stripes? What the heck? Did he confuse the internet for a public appearance in his phsical form?
After noting the Green New Deal’s call to decrease airplane usage, Lee used his time to suggest tauntauns—the space lizards from Empire Strikes Back—as a replacement for those in Alaska. I swear to you, the bad-faith rebuttals only got worse.
I am seriously confused about his whole argument. It sounds like he had a long weekend of Netflix and chill, watching movie after movie, when he suddenly realised he had to hold a speech against the Green New Deal, so he scrapped up the movies he watched, including Dr. Evil, Sharknado 4, and the Star Wars franchise.
Lee followed up the Star Wars reference with one to Aquaman’s large seahorse from Super Friends, saying they would replace inter-continental travel for those in Hawaii.
Now, I can't resist laughing about him... :'D
He then tried to allude to a supposed bovine genocide—aka the call for decreased industrial cow farming—by saying he’s “visited some farms,” and talked to cows about the Green New Deal.
«Hey, cow, what do you think about no longer being used to give milk or be slain in an abattoir to be fed to human beings?»
#US #USA #GreenNewDeal #ClimateChange #GlobalWarming #HRes109 #News #Politics #Lee #MikeLee #Utah #Sharknado #DrEvil #Aquaman #TheEmpireStrikesBack #MakeBabiesNotWar #MarryToFightGlobalWarming #BovineGenocide #Humour #Humour #Funny #Trump #DonaldTrump #Trumpism #Trumponomics #Trumpocracy #Republican #RedWave #Environment #Environmentalism
 

Death Valley now hosts first sea ever


“It was breathtaking! In between shooting photographs, we always steal a few seconds for ourselves and take some deep breaths out there, allowing the scene to wash over us in all its ephemeral beauty,” Elliot McGucken told AccuWeather over the phone.

“I kept planning and canceling [trips to Death Valley], but I know that as time goes on you get less and less chance for rain as you get into summer, so I figured I better go now, so I did. I was really lucky,” McGucken told AccuWeather.

“I kept planning and canceling [trips to Death Valley], but I know that as time goes on you get less and less chance for rain as you get into summer, so I figured I better go now, so I did. I was really lucky,” McGucken told AccuWeather.
#DeathValley #Desert #Nevada #US #UsA #GlobalWarming #ClimateChange #News #Environment #Environmentalism
 
#CO2 #ClimateChange #GlobalWarming
Life on Earth was nearly doomed by too little CO2
 
#Insect #Apocalypse #Wind #Turbines #ClimateChange #GlobalWarming
New Study: German Wind Turbines Kill 1,200 Tons Of Insects Per Year
 
#Insect #Apocalypse #Wind #Turbines #ClimateChange #GlobalWarming
New Study: German Wind Turbines Kill 1,200 Tons Of Insects Per Year
 

US, SA and Brazil derail UN resolution to regulate geo-engineering


Switzerland and nine other nations originally asked the U.N. Environment Programme for guidance on possible future governance options and analysis of the implications of geoengineering, but they agreed to substantially reduce the scope of their resolution in hopes that the United States, Saudi Arabia and Brazil would allow it to move forward.

Besides Switzerland, the motion was backed by Burkina Faso, Micronesia, Georgia, Liechtenstein, Mali, Mexico, Montenegro, New Zealand, Niger and Senegal. Other parties, including some European nations and Bolivia, argued for even stronger language for using caution in approaching geoengineering. None of them opposed the final resolution.

“It seems to me inconsistent to say, on the one hand, that global warming is the biggest problem that humanity faces, and then go on to say, on the other hand, but we shouldn’t even do research on SRM because it may pose risks,” he said. “Either climate change is the biggest problem we face or it’s not. And if it is, then it’s all hands on deck.”
#US #USA #SaudiArabia #Brazil #SA #News #Politics #Environment #Environmentalism #GlobalWarming #ClimateChange #IPCC #UN #UnitedNations
 

Floods cause Midwestern emergency


“Many residents and communities across our state have been responding to flooding that has impacted homes, businesses, and cities and towns across Wisconsin," Evers said in a statement. "The warm temperatures and rain the last few days have caused much of the heavy snowpack and ice to melt resulting in flooding, ice jams, and rivers and creeks to rise."
#US #USA #Floods# NaturalCatastrophe #NaturalHazard #News #Trump #DonaldTrump #Nebraska #Midwest #GlobalWarming #ClimateChange #Environment #Environmentalism
 
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